Reader reviews and comments on The Poisonwood Bible, plus links to write your own review.

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The Poisonwood Bible

by Barbara Kingsolver

The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver X
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
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  • First Published:
    Oct 1998, 543 pages
    Sep 1999, 560 pages

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There are currently 131 reader reviews for The Poisonwood Bible
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Lizzy (01/16/04)

so far i've liked the book, but it is not the best i've is however a difficult book to read and anyone who could write like that deserves my appriecation
Brechtje van Nunen (01/16/04)

This is a kind of book that makes you forget where you are and takes you on a trip through the lifes of the family Price in the Congo. It's one of my favorite novels because of the way the story is narrated by the four daughters and the wife of the preacher. It makes you think about how people experince religion in different countrys and different stages of their lifes. I recommend this book strongly to anyone who wants to go on a mission to bring the gospel to countrys so much different than where you come from.

Also the story is grate for the description of the African nature and it's beauty. But it doesn't leave out the difficulties of everydays struggle to stay alive.

I believe that in the end it is a very sad story about how one person can have so much influence on other peoples lifes that it takes them a lifetime to come to terms with that.

Grant Crow (01/01/04)

The Poisonwood Bible is well written, with underlying moral themes, but in parts the story sags and becomes less than entertaining.
Ashley (10/24/03)

I loved it. I'm a senior in HS and we had to read this for my multicultural literature class. At first the class was kind of ify about it because it was lengthy and about history and such but then every student couldn't help but fall in love with the characters and hope the best for them. She is a great author who made this book come alive and made you feel like you were there.
Kristin (10/06/03)

Wow-- talk about talent! Each section of The Poisonwood Bible is labeled as to who narrates it, but after a few passages, the labels are unnecessary! Kingsolver does such a good job at keeping each girl's voice independent of the others, the reader can quickly place each voice with its owner.
Kara (09/08/03)

This book is for those who like to think. It's simple: if you don't like to think hard then don't read the book. If you're up for a book that will challenge what you believe, buy it. All in all, I enjoyed it; it is very well-written. I agree with Pat; Kingsolver is a master at expressing what she really wants to say while making you think hard.
Elsa (08/19/03)

I just finished the Poisonwood Bible and I must say that it is one of the most impressive novels I have read in a while. Kingsolver succeeds in creating 5 distinct voices (for each of the Price girls and their mother, Orleanna) so unique and layered that you can't help but fall in love with them. Morever, there is an almost perfect balance in the book between the personal--that is the disintegration of a family--and the political. Not only that--these two elements actually mirror and act as metaphors for each other. Brilliant.
Miki (08/07/03)

plot is boring in terms of adventure and action. personalities are very well developed. rachel is the spoiled princess. leah is the adventurous tomboy. adah is the shrewd and observant cat. ruth may is the charming 5 year old. overall, the story is touching, accompanied with some humor, as you hear these four sisters talk about their time spent in the Belgian Congo.

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