Summary and book reviews of Invisible by Paul Auster

Invisible

by Paul Auster

Invisible by Paul Auster X
Invisible by Paul Auster
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  • First Published:
    Oct 2009, 320 pages
    Paperback:
    Jun 2010, 320 pages

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Book Reviewed by:
Amy Reading
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About this Book

Book Summary

“One of America’s greatest novelists” dazzlingly reinvents the coming-of-age story in his most passionate and surprising book to date.

Sinuously constructed in four interlocking parts, Paul Auster's fifteenth novel opens in New York City in the spring of 1967, when twenty-year-old Adam Walker, an aspiring poet and student at Columbia University, meets the enigmatic Frenchman Rudolf Born and his silent and seductive girfriend, Margot. Before long, Walker finds himself caught in a perverse triangle that leads to a sudden, shocking act of violence that will alter the course of his life.

Three different narrators tell the story of Invisible, a novel that travels in time from 1967 to 2007 and moves from Morningside Heights, to the Left Bank of Paris, to a remote island in the Caribbean. It is a book of youthful rage, unbridled sexual hunger, and a relentless quest for justice. With uncompromising insight, Auster takes us into the shadowy borderland between truth and memory, between authorship and identity, to produce a work of unforgettable power that confirms his reputation as "one of America's most spectacularly inventive writers."

I

I shook his hand for the first time in the spring of 1967. I was a second- year student at Columbia then, a know-nothing boy with an appetite for books and a belief (or delusion) that one day I would become good enough to call myself a poet, and because I read poetry, I had already met his namesake in Dante’s hell, a dead man shuffling through the final verses of the twenty-eighth canto of the Inferno. Bertran de Born, the twelfth-century Provençal poet, carrying his severed head by the hair as it sways back and forth like a lantern— surely one of the most grotesque images in that book-length catalogue of hallucinations and torments. Dante was a staunch defender of de Born’s writing, but he condemned him to eternal damnation for having counseled Prince Henry to rebel against his father, King Henry II, and because de Born caused division between father and son and turned them into enemies, Dante’s ingenious punishment was to divide de Born ...

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Reviews

BookBrowse Review

BookBrowse

When you pick up a Paul Auster novel, a spell descends over you. As if you are in a funhouse car, you are hooked onto the tracks of the story and pulled into its depths... His abiding love for frame narratives places Auster in the company of metafiction novelists like Vladimir Nabokov, Thomas Pynchon, or Italo Calvino, yet he is not a flashy, fancy, or difficult writer. Invisible sounds exactly like someone talking to you about something astonishing that happened to him when he was young. It is impossible not to listen...continued

Full Review (715 words).

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(Reviewed by Amy Reading).

Media Reviews

Time Out New York
[A] winningly elliptical mystery that’s at once textbook Auster and a satisfying departure.

O, the Oprah Magazine
[A]n intricate and compelling construction... Even as the pages fly by, you feel [Auster's] seriousness and his deep sense of the mysteries that attend human loneliness and desire.

The Independent (UK)
...its narrative strands are not sufficiently developed to engage... the deliberately congested authorship, which seems the novel's greater emphasis, remains self-referential and unrewarding.

Publishers Weekly
As the plot moves toward a Heart of Darkness–style journey into madness, the limits of Auster's formalism become more apparent, but this study of a young poet doomed to life as a manifestation of poetry carries startling weight

Library Journal
If you've never read Auster, this is a great place to start ... If you've been a fan for a long time, you will not be disappointed.

Booklist
Starred Review.

Kirkus Reviews
Starred Review. Auster writes of 'the obsessive story that has wormed its way into your soul and become an integral part of your being.' This is that story.

Reader Reviews

Ole P. Pedersen

The fall and fall and fall of meta novels
This is actually the first Auster book I have read, and maybe I should have started somewhere else. Auster writes well and creates a couple of interesting characters, but he doesn't really get close to them, not even the main man, Adam. The time ...   Read More

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Beyond the Book

Frame Narration and Ekphrasis

Paul Auster frequently employs two particular literary techniques which, when combined, turn his novels into multi-layered stories with internal echoes and reverberations.

The first is a frame narrative, in which the main plot is a story, usually in the form of a manuscript, which is discovered and introduced by someone else. This device paradoxically helps establish the reality of Auster's world at the same time that it highlights the book's flagrant fictionality as mere words on a page. On the one hand, the embedded story's status as a text prevents the reader from getting fully immersed in it. On the other hand, the context that is built around the embedded story becomes a kind of self-referential world. It is the resonance between ...

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