Reader reviews and comments on Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald, plus links to write your own review.

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Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald

by Therese Fowler

Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald
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  • First Published:
    Mar 2013, 352 pages
    Mar 2014, 384 pages

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Book Reviewed by:
Poornima Apte

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There are currently 9 reader reviews for Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald
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Mina Christina (02/26/15)

Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald
This was a great read. The differences between Scott and Zelda is immense as he is a scruffy guy from the up North and she is a Southern Belle. Their lifestyle and the need to impress Scott's peers are what set them up for a difficult marriage. Upon completion of this novel, it is evident that Zelda's mental issues were brought upon by Scott's insecurities and inability to value his wife. It's a shame that in the 20s women were nothing more than accessories even though most of these women were the backbone of their husbands. Would recommend this read to anyone interested in the 20s and the flapper extravagant lifestyle.
Elizabeth G. (05/17/13)

I'll Take Zelda
Z, the novel about the life of Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald is at points charming and; like another reviewer, I kept thinking of the movie, "Midnight in Paris." It was very interesting, having a degree in literature, and learning more about this couple. I'm not one that puts Fitzgerald in the best writers of all time column. He might have been if he applied himself a bit differently. And Zelda might have been had she been allowed. But it does give a view into that time: The Lost Generation. My great aunts lived at this time and did not marry but had really big careers and traveled and visited the Algonquin, so I'm always curious to learn more. I also kind of feel the same as Zelda about Hemmingway, but do love a couple of his novels. But I could never understand the huge ordeal over The Old Man and the Sea. Really? I am missing something. But I like Zelda and I like reading her perspective of things, fictional as they might be.
KristinaK (04/01/13)

Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald
It was hard to read this novel after having seen Woody Allen's movie, "Midnight in Paris." I kept hearing his actors' voices in my head while reading. In spite of that, like some of the other reviewers, I found the novel challenging to get into at first. And while I appreciate how Ms. Fowler created Zelda's character, I found myself more inspired to read Nancy Mitford's biography of Zelda called "Zelda." Still, it's a novel worth reading if you enjoy a dip into the era of the Lost Generation.
Karen R (04/01/13)

Excellent story
Beautiful Zelda Sayre, a wealthy, fiery and spoiled Southern Belle met her husband F. Scott Fitzgerald, an Army man and budding novelist, shortly after she finished high school. This thoughtfully written book takes us on their life’s journey, through the glitz and glamour that came along with F. Scott’s literary celebrity. They were madly in love, traveled the world and lived in opulence. Interesting literary and artistic acquaintances are introduced along the way, rich and famous trailblazers of the times. The Fitzgerald’s’ story is a tragic one, as alcoholism, restlessness, jealousy and depression take a grim toll on their health and marriage. I sympathized with Zelda who spent many years in the shadow of and being tormented by an overbearing, obsessed and unpleasant man. She was gifted in ballet, art and writing, having written many of the stories that Scott took credit for. I felt her sadness time and time again, as she has to give up her dreams due to Scott’s selfishness. Scattered throughout the book are letters between Zelda and her friends and family. Letter writing is a lost art and I loved that the author included these.
Lori (03/19/13)

Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald
I found Z very interesting, especially having read both The Paris Wife and The Aviator's Wife and other readings from that time period, so this added to my impression of the 20's. I previously had known very little about the Fitzgeralds, so I appreciated learning about them and more about the time period.

I found the book well-written, and I think book groups will appreciate reading this book. I think there are lots of issues which could be great for discussions.
obsessedreader (03/17/13)

nothing new here
Therese Anne Fowler's Z/A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald seems to have been written to cash in on the success of Paula McLain's The Paris Wife.

While I thoroughly enjoyed McLain's book (how much do most of us know, after all, about Hadley?), I found Fowler's book quite tedious. It may be that I've already read enough about Zelda. Nothing new is revealed in this latest effort: it's almost common knowledge.

But my primary criticism is that the writing just never rang true for me. I never felt that it was actually Zelda doing the narrating. Everything was all too crisp and matter-of-fact. It parroted the style of McLain's much more successful book.

I do not recommend Z at all. There are thousands of biographies more worth one's time.
Power Reviewer Shof (03/07/13)

The Other Side of Paradise
Like most readers, "The Great Gatsby" was my Fitzgerald source. I also knew Scott became an alcoholic and Zelda ended up in a home for people with mental problems and that is pretty much it.

Therese Fowler filled in the gaps in this well-written biographical novel. At first I felt as if I was reading about Daisy Buchanan, Gatsby's long lost love and thought I would have to force myself to continue. But Fowler rounded out these characters so I could see how little they knew about life, how truly lost they were.

This is the tragic story of lost souls who have no coping skills. Having read about the lost generation, I was able to see how ill-prepared Zelda and Scott were to live a fulfilling life.

Scott's alcoholism was fueled by a massive inferiority complex and Zelda's fragile mental state--Fowler suggests she was bipolar--along with other health problems and a dysfunctional marriage eventually contributed to a complete breakdown.

Zelda's story became a compelling read for me. When I finished, I couldn't let go of the tragic waste of a once vibrant person, actually persons.

This book should be read along with Paula Mclain's "The Paris Wife" which covers the same period of time of Hemingway's life. It is also worth rereading Scott's novels as well as Zelda's "Save Me the Waltz."
Kay (02/28/13)

A Woman trying to find her way, Zelda
Therese Anne Fowler gives the reader a well researched fictionalized account of the life of Zelda Fitzgerald in Z, A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald. I came to know Zelda in these pages as a woman struggling with her own identity. Married to a driven to-be- perfect husband and living in a time when women are coming out of their homes to become people in their own right, Zelda struggles to find her own success. I learned that Zelda was not just the Flapper described in her husband's writings, but a modern woman like us all struggling to be her own person. This book flowed well, presented a real person with problems, and left me with a curiosity to find out more about the Fitzgerald's.
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