Reader reviews and comments on The Pilot's Wife, plus links to write your own review.

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reading Guide |  Reviews |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

The Pilot's Wife

by Anita Shreve

The Pilot's Wife
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    Mar 1999, 293 pages
    Paperback:
    Mar 1999, 293 pages

  • Rate this book


Buy This Book

About this Book

Reviews

Page 4 of 5
There are currently 33 reader reviews for The Pilot's Wife
Order Reviews by:

Write your own review!

Tammy Adkison (09/05/02)

The suspense keeps you reading. I never wanted to put the book down. Kathern was a strong women to go to London.
Gary (08/20/02)

It was an exciting book until the end. The end appeared to go off on a different tangent entirely as if Shreve hadn't really decided how to end it or an editor suggested this ending to attract interest through an IRA link which really had nothing to do with the very good plot to that point. Anyway it could have been a classic without the weak and obtuse ending.
Dave (05/09/02)

hi Dee.

I too, had the novel "The Pilots Wife" recommended. In fact it was the Oprah Winfrey book club recommendation that finally sold it to me, and started me on the quest to read each and every one of the Anita Shreve books.

As for "ale" not being sold in todays pubs, true but there are still many that have a preference for "real ale" but I don't know if this qualifies, in this case.

Yes, there were certainly plenty of other "issues" raised. It was the way in which Anita Shreve gradually unravelled, small pieces at a time, the alternative character of the husband that had me enthralled.

Anonymous (08/12/01)

Dee
I live in Cambridge, England and was given the book by an American friend. I have never read any of Anita's books before and was interested to give it a try.
At the beginning I found the book fascinating and intriguing - there was obviously a secret there somewhere! Unfortunately , as I read on I became more disappointed - the 'other' family was enough, surely, without the other issues?
Nevertheless, I will read more of Anita's books. One thing please - we don't drink glasses of 'ale' in England (well not since the 17th century at any rate!) and it doesn't rain all the time!!
Anonymous (08/12/01)

Amber
I do not understand the ending either! What lottery ticket is she talking about? And when she is saying that across the sea, is that to Jack or to Muire? I loved the book until I got to those last few lines. They totally threw me off!
[In later message] I get it!! The thing she had been meaning to do: call Muire. The lottery ticket: the one that had Muire's brother's number on the back. The silence in London: the person who picked up the phone did not respond. She was telling the "A" person (whom she had suspected had been given custody of the children) that she wanted to make sure they were alright. I am so relieved that I understand it now :) It really was a wonderful book.
Anonymous (08/12/01)

Amber
I do not understand the ending either! What lottery ticket is she talking about? And when she is saying that across the sea, is that to Jack or to Muire? I loved the book until I got to those last few lines. They totally threw me off!
[In later message] I get it!! The thing she had been meaning to do: call Muire. The lottery ticket: the one that had Muire's brother's number on the back. The silence in London: the person who picked up the phone did not respond. She was telling the "A" person (whom she had suspected had been given custody of the children) that she wanted to make sure they were alright. I am so relieved that I understand it now :) It really was a wonderful book.
Anonymous (08/12/01)

Lindsey
I'm not sure that I understand the ending to this book either. She ends the book by Kathryn saying: "I just wanted to know if the children are all right," she said across the sea. Does this mean that she called Muire in Ireland and became a part of their lives? If anyone knows what the ending means please tell me. Thank you!
Anonymous (08/12/01)

Kathy Raines
I enjoyed this book. It came very highly recommended by a friend, but I didn't enjoy it quite as much as I expected. I found the descriptions quite good; I found myself pausing and rereading parts of them. For such an exciting topic, I thought it moved a bit slowly. I found myself hungry for a bit of humor now and then. Even books about tragedies can inspire a laugh now and then, maybe in the dialogue. Everyone seemed quite humorless. Nevertheless, I enjoyed getting into Katherine's (sp)? head; what happened in her mind seemed quite believable. As always, I wondered about the characters' economic situations. Personally, I can't just slap down the dough and speed off to England. In fact, I haven't been there yet. Most people I know save for a while before taking such a trip! I loved the theme of betrayal and the ever present question, "Just how well can you really know anybody?" It's universal; everyone deals with betrayal of various degrees in their lifetimes. I am glad I read the book. It will live on within me. Now here's one thing. How realistic is it that a good-looking, kind man would so quickly appear as a friend, even though he did withhold information for a while. However, I enjoyed it! The touch of romance was satisfying.

One-Month Free Membership

Join Today!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: Here I Am
    Here I Am
    by Jonathan Safran Foer
    With almost all the accoutrements of upper middle-class suburban life, Julia and Jacob Bloch fit the...
  • Book Jacket: Harmony
    Harmony
    by Carolyn Parkhurst
    In previous novels such as The Dogs of Babel and Lost and Found, Carolyn Parkhurst has shown herself...
  • Book Jacket: Commonwealth
    Commonwealth
    by Ann Patchett
    Opening Ann Patchett's novel Commonwealth about two semi-functional mid-late 20th Century ...

First Impressions

  • Book Jacket

    Darling Days
    by iO Tillett Wright

    A devastatingly powerful memoir of one young woman's extraordinary coming of age.

    Read Member Reviews

  • Book Jacket

    The Tea Planter's Wife
    by Dinah Jefferies

    An utterly engrossing, compulsive page-turner set in 1920s Ceylon.

    Read Member Reviews

Book Discussions
Book Jacket
Sweet Caress
by William Boyd

William Boyd's Sweet Caress captures an entire lifetime unforgettably within its pages. It captivates.

About the book
Join the discussion!
Win this book!
Win Blood at the Root

Blood at the Root

"A gripping, timely, and important examination of American racism."
- PW Starred Review

Enter

Word Play

Solve this clue:

D C Y C Before T A H

and be entered to win..

Books that     
entertain,
     engage

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends books that we believe to be best in class. Books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, that will expand your mind and challenge you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.

 
X

Free Weekly Newsletter

Keep up with what's happening in the world of books:
Reviews, previews, interviews and more!



Spam Free: Your email is never shared with anyone; opt out any time.