Reader reviews and comments on The God of Small Things, plus links to write your own review.

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reading Guide |  Reviews |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

The God of Small Things

by Arundhati Roy

The God of Small Things
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    May 1997, 321 pages
    Paperback:
    May 1998, 321 pages

  • Rate this book


Buy This Book

About this Book

Reviews

Page 5 of 7
There are currently 55 reader reviews for The God of Small Things
Order Reviews by:

Write your own review!

diriye osman (12/03/03)

In Arundhati Roy's masterpiece The God Of Small things, we are invited to view the world and it's many injustices through the eyes of seven year old Rahel and her mute twin brother Esthappen.
It is essentially the lush vibrant depiction of miriad emotions blurring together to form epic tragedies that makes this particular novel a sad and subversively subliminal effort.
Roy explores the grandiose themes--family, love, death, betrayal, rapturous affairs, caste systems--with an emotive tone that delves deeper into the human condition.
The structure of the plot itself seems inimitable and clever, gathering random revelations that eventually construct themselves into an overwhelming denouement.

Divya (12/01/03)

I love the way the author has used repetition as a tool,throughout the book,consistently.Also the way she had described nature.Description through smell(smell of sour metal,smell of roses on a breeze) strikes a familiar chord or two in the readers mind whenever it is repeated.This book , written by a feminist point of view ,brings out the harsh injustice women in India faced even in the post -independence era.And caste discrimination that existed at the time.And last but not least the book taken you into the minds of children.Small things that amuse children,that give them pleasure (that go unnoticed by the adult eye)are depicted so wonderfully.This is the first time I've read a novel set in India.And I'm so in love with it.Looking forward to many such novels from Ms Roy.
Tami Jean-Claude (11/18/03)

The novel had a good plot and I like it how the author used the mind of two seven years olds on it, but I think she used too much imagery in the book and it was too disorganized. I got to know more about the indian culture, and it was very interesting.
Sarah (11/06/03)

I had to read this book for my Critical Thinking class and it was amazing. I think whoever didn't understand the book MUST read it again. It's definetly worth it! Mrs. Roy is awsome. I totaly love her writing style.
Adrienne (11/06/03)

I read The God of Small Things a few months ago, and must add it is one of the most powerful novels I have ever set my eyes on. I was captivated from beginning to end with the writing style of Arundhati Roy. Her words flow like lyrics in a Noor Jahan song. I am in the midst of assisting an author friend with his newest piece -- Roy's writing touched me so, that I have acknowledged her in my preface.
Kates (11/02/03)

The narration drives me insane. Nothing is in chronological order, and the way Roy puts bits and pieces of every side story here and there makes it nearly impossible to follow. The pieces are so spread out that it's confusing and once I got to the end of the story I wasn't able to put them all back together-- It's like she took the story, cut it into a puzzle with 50,000 pieces, and then shoved them into a haystack that's 30 feet tall and 10 feet wide. Even if you're able to retreive all the pieces, it's nearly impossible to put the puzzle together.
darfu (10/28/03)

amazing narration and an ending that will make your mind quiver
yamah (10/23/03)

I really didnt get what all the hype was all about. perhaps the media was trying to create another persona that they could sell - a beautiful woman writer from the third world. as for the book, the writing style was a little too contrived. each word had been carefully weighed. i dont deny, that there was a flow in her use of language and the words carry you with ease from beggining to end....but the story essentially left me completely unmoved. at the end of the book, i felt like, god, this was just fluff and feathers. there was nothing new about the ideas in the book to one well aquainted with india - just typical indian scenes and situations. perhaps this book has been deliberately written for the international market.
Member Benefits

Join Now!

Check the advantages!
Just $10 for 3 months or $35 for a year

    •  
    • FREE
    • MEMBER
    • Range of media reviews for each book
    • Excerpts of all featured books
    • Author bios, interviews and pronunciations
    • Browse by genre
    • Book club discussions
    • Book club advice and reading guides
    • BookBrowse reviews and "beyond the book" back-stories
    •  
    • Reviews of notable books ahead of publication
    •  
    • Free books to read and review (US Only)
    •  
    • Browse for the best books by time period, setting & theme
    •  
    • Read-alike suggestions for thousands of books and authors
    •  
    • 'My Reading List" to keep track of your books
    •  

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: The Invisible Life of Ivan Isaenko
    The Invisible Life of Ivan Isaenko
    by Scott Stambach
    BookBrowse First Impression reviewers were uniformly impressed by this difficult yet heartwarming ...
  • Book Jacket: Boy Erased
    Boy Erased
    by Garrard Conley
    Growing up in rural Arkansas, Garrard Conley did not quite fit the mold of his strait-laced, ...
  • Book Jacket: The Bones of Grace
    The Bones of Grace
    by Tahmima Anam
    The Bones of Grace completes Tahmima Anam's Bangladesh trilogy. The three novels, which can be ...

First Impressions

  • Book Jacket

    All the Ugly and Wonderful Things
    by Bryn Greenwood

    A memorable coming-of-age tale about loyalty, defiance, and the power of love.

    Read Member Reviews

  • Book Jacket

    The Invisible Life of Ivan Isaenko
    by Scott Stambach

    "An auspicious, gut-wrenching, wonderful debut." - Kirkus, starred review

    Read Member Reviews

Book Discussions
Book Jacket
This Must Be the Place
by Maggie O'Farrell

An irresistible love story for fans of Beautiful Ruins and Where'd You Go, Bernadette?

About the book
Join the discussion!
Win this book!
Win Lady Cop Makes Trouble

The Kopp Sisters Return!

One of the nation's first female deputy sheriffs returns in another gripping adventure based on fact.

Enter

Word Play

Solve this clue:

Manners M (T) M

and be entered to win..

Books that     
entertain,
     engage

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends books that we believe to be best in class. Books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, that will expand your mind and challenge you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.

 
X

Free Weekly Newsletter

Keep up with what's happening in the world of books:
Reviews, previews, interviews and more!



Spam Free: Your email is never shared with anyone; opt out any time.