Reader reviews and comments on The Da Vinci Code, plus links to write your own review.

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The Da Vinci Code

by Dan Brown

The Da Vinci Code
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  • First Published:
    Mar 2003, 464 pages
    Paperback:
    Mar 2006, 496 pages

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There are currently 162 reader reviews for The Da Vinci Code
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ian (03/02/04)

A first rate thriller of a book, I couldn't put it down, I am now a fan of Dan Brown
bernardo rodriguez (02/27/04)

This book presents a mixed bag. As a thriller it is tight and enthusiastic. as history, it is garbled and poor. My problem is that Mr. Brown infuses the book with pseudo lore in a way that seems didiactic and adressed to the reader. The effect is that it disconects one from the plot. For example, one gets tired of the seemingly endless pages where the mythology of thwe book is prsented with profundity and the writer keeps showing us what the character thinks - 'and did you know x? No, wow! You think that's amazing? Did you know y? No, super wow!' In addition, the characterization was so poor that the one character that is nearest to being fleshed out is dead.

I must add that I have a degree in medieval studies. However, that did not stop me from liking The Name of the Roseor Foucault's Pendulum - let alone Fantasy literature. In fact, it is precisely because I have a degree in that subject that I enjoyed the books of Eco so much more. Eco's books are full and rich overall. The Davinci Code is not. Mr. Brown seems to have stumbled onto many of the non surprising surprises and insights the day before he sat down to write the book. Also, he keeps using foreign words in his prose when they have no reason to be there. Furthermore, since only the mythology is thoroughly explored, the narrative becomes lopsided. Finally, the book seems too calculated and slick. It is wall to wall with the precise names of equipment and vehicles. I suppose it is there to lend a hard edge to an otherwise sophomoric effort.

Enjoy the book mais slink down in your chair feel free to daydream when Mr. Brown starts his lecture.
Tom Wright (02/25/04)

An intriguing plot hampered by poor prose. It has piqued my curiosity and I'm planning to do more research on the subject. The DaVinci Code will make a great movie as long as the dialog is improved over the book.
celia (02/25/04)

I have to add--balancing some of my earlier negative comments (though the fact that I kept turning pages is highly positive and something every writer is delighted to hear)--that it was worth the reading time to me because it reminded me of my childhood visit to Rosslyn Chapel (Scotland). What an amazing place, whatever your beliefs (or lack of them)! I visited the website, and several others, and came away wishing that I had been older than eight at the time my parents took me there. Also have told my husband that we have to put it on our travel schedule as soon as possible! Extraordinary!
Ree (02/24/04)

I loved the Da Vinci Code - anything that can get the "good old boys" I work with to forget about football, basketball, baseball, golf, etc... at lunch - and carry on a conversation - well, hey! "I appreciate!"
Barbara Jackson (02/24/04)

It was a great read...but why so many mistakes and errors in research beginning with the title. Da Vinci is not a last name....Leonardo was born in a village called Vinci. Leonardo of Vinci.
So...."Of Vinci Code"??????
Dee (02/24/04)

I found this to be a script ready to be made into a movie featuring Pierce Brosnan. The main characters are one dimensional, the only thing going for it is an interesting sub-plot and chapters that are no longer than five pages long.
celia (02/24/04)

Ipa, I would not have devoted any of my scarce free time to reading a (generally) poorly written book had I not been interested in the subject matter. I have an open mind where Mary Magdalene is concerned; I think she could have been the wife of Jesus, and that wouldn't bother me a bit. I find no proof though, and I have devoted more of my (scarce) free time in trying to locate some. By the way, are you certain those books one can look up--I've now seen a couple--are strictly factual? Wishful thinking, seems to me. My point about Mary, the mother, is simply that the Catholic church has paid much attention to her, as compared to protestant churches. Not exactly, therefore, an example of the Church's attempt to eliminate "the sacred feminine" would you say? (I'm not a Catholic, by the way.) I have enough knowledge of art history, through my art historian husband, etc., to know that Brown's book is rife with errors about Leonardo and his work. Not exactly a confidence builder. Nancy Drew was fine when I was 9, but I have long since outgrown her--and that sort of contrived chapter ending.

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