What readers think of The Language of Flowers, plus links to write your own review.

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reading Guide |  Reviews |  Beyond the book |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

The Language of Flowers

A Novel

by Vanessa Diffenbaugh

The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh X
The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    Aug 2011, 336 pages

    Paperback:
    Apr 2012, 352 pages

    Genres

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
BookBrowse First Impression Reviewers
Buy This Book

About this Book

Reviews

Page 3 of 5
There are currently 34 reader reviews for The Language of Flowers
Order Reviews by:

Write your own review!

Debra F. (Alton Bay, NH)

Flowers in Bloom!
I can't say enough in praise of this debut novel about the facets of relationships between mothers and daughters, friends and lovers. The story is filled with heartache, heartbreak, small miracles, and love, and it's all pulled together with the meanings and messages of the Victorian flower language. A perfect page-turner of a summer read!
Cheryl W. (Faribault, Mn)

Very enjoyable
This book is the story of a foster child trying to find her way in the world. Her life is based on the Language of Flowers, her way of communication. Fortunately most people around her understand this language, other she teaches them as her business grows. She is fearful and has trust issues. Running away is her way of coping. She finally faces her fears and failures. I'd look forward to second book.....
Barbara B. (Alta Loma, CA)

Bird of Paradise
This first novel by Vanessa Diffenbaugh is a Bird of Paradise, magnificent. to me, it is about a young woman's search for love and acceptance, but she has an extremely difficult time realizing that she is worthy and capable, after being raised in the foster care system. She is rebellious when ever she comes near to feeling love and acceptance. Only through the language of the flowers she so dearly loves, is she able to feel love, belonging and acceptance.
I have already told friends that this is a must read.
Barbara S. (Glen Ellyn, Illinois)

The Language of Flowers
I would like to personally hand a Red Rose to Vanessa Diffenbaugh for her first novel, The Language of Flowers. I loved it! She has managed to weave together her knowledge of the meaning of flowers (including a Dictionary of Flowers created by the main character in the book) with an in depth look at the foster care system, weddings, marriage, heartbreak and mending fences. I hope it won’t take too long for Vanessa Diffenbaugh to produce her second novel; I’m looking forward to another great read!
Power Reviewer
Diane S. (Batavia, IL)

The Language of Flowers
From its wonderful cover (simple but elegant) to the wonderful characters this book is one that I enjoyed immensely. It is such a unique concept to use the language of flowers as a form of communication and I liked learning the meanings of these flowers. All of us have baggage from the past we try to deal with and it was heartbreaking yet joyful to watch Victoria struggle and than to grow as a person and someone who is able to accept and give love. Readers of Anne River Siddons, Elizabeth Berg and Anita Shreve will love this book.
Lynn R. (Wautoma, WI)

The Languagae of Flowers
I feel that this is one of the best books that I have written a review for. I was always interested in the way that Victoria responded to life situatiions after having been a fostor child most of her life. I feel that it brought out the insecurities and lack of trust in general that foster kids develop when they become adults. Of course not all foster kids have bad lives, and Victoria did not have a bad life, just not a good one, some of which she brought on herself because of these insecurities.

The book tells a story of one foster child and how not being able to trust in humankind can cause some sad mistakes and also how love can change things. I would recommend this book for just about anyone, it would be a great book for book clubs.
Jean N. (New Richmond, OH)

The Language of Flowers
When I finished this book, it was hard to let go of Victoria. I wanted to keep walking down the road with her. She is a character that I'll always remember.

What a valuable, heartfelt book. One of those books that stands heads above so many others- it is unforgettable. I want to stand up and cheer for Victoria and for this book.

Thank you Vanessa Diffenbaugh.
Diane D. (Blairstown, NJ)

!
This was a very well-written book, but the subject matter made it hard for me to read...especially at first. Our granddaughter was in a group home for several years, before she was adopted (around the age of 13) by a good family. We're just thankful we were able to keep connected to her, even though it's been difficult. She had many of the same types of problems Victoria had, and she's still dealing with them, even though she's in her late 20s and living on her own.

I wanted to read this book BECAUSE of the subject. I wasn't surprised at what I read, since we've been through a lot of it; and I hope this book can help the "system" change some, but it probably won't. What it will do is help other people understand what these kids go through...something I think is a "Good Thing". I don't remember reading anything about counselling, but maybe each state is different as to whether they do much of that.

The one thing that bothered me, and a lot of books do it, was the jumping back & forth between "then & now", though I understand that it probably was done to compare what was happening at different stages of Victoria's life.

Become a Member

Join BookBrowse today to start discovering exceptional books!

Find out more


Top Picks

  • Book Jacket: The World Keeps Ending, and the World Goes On
    The World Keeps Ending, and the World Goes On
    by Franny Choi
    Calamity can cohabit with joy, and you and I have, on some plane, accepted that absurd reality. We ...
  • Book Jacket: Bloodbath Nation
    Bloodbath Nation
    by Paul Auster
    In recent years, Booker Prize­–nominated novelist Paul Auster has increasingly turned to ...
  • Book Jacket: The Nazi Conspiracy
    The Nazi Conspiracy
    by Brad Meltzer, Josh Mensch
    The Nazi Conspiracy by Brad Meltzer and Josh Mensch was a big hit with our First Impressions readers...
  • Book Jacket
    Yonder
    by Jabari Asim
    The captivating historical novel Yonder turns an intimate lens towards the tragedy and survivorship ...

Book Club Discussion

Book Jacket
The Love of My Life
by Rosie Walsh
An up-all-night love story wrapped in a mystery from the New York Times bestselling author of Ghosted.

Members Recommend

  • Book Jacket

    Margot
    by Wendell Steavenson

    A young woman struggles to break free of her upper-class upbringing amid the whirlwind years of the sexual revolution.

  • Book Jacket

    Wade in the Water
    by Nyani Nkrumah

    A gripping debut novel of female power and vulnerability, race, and class set in a small Mississippi town in the early 1980s.

  • Book Jacket

    Moonrise Over New Jessup
    by Jamila Minnicks

    "Jamila Minnicks pulled me into pages of history I'd never turned before."—Barbara Kingsolver

Wordplay

Solve this clue:

It's A G T Me

and be entered to win..

Who Said...

The longest journey of any person is the journey inward

Click Here to find out who said this, as well as discovering other famous literary quotes!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends the best in contemporary fiction and nonfiction—books that not only engage and entertain but also deepen our understanding of ourselves and the world around us.