Reader reviews and comments on The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, plus links to write your own review.

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The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

by Kate DiCamillo, Bagram Ibatoulline

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane
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  • First Published:
    Feb 2006, 228 pages
    Paperback:
    Jan 2008, 208 pages

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There are currently 25 reader reviews for The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane
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lover (09/23/10)

AWESOME
I love this book. It's so awesome, and I love the Tale of Desperaux too!
Crystal (03/29/10)

steals your heart
This book stole my heart I loved it. I feel almost everyone can relate to some part of this book. Edward's journeys can teach you a lot about yourself and others. This book leaves you wanting more and more.
Rose (11/30/09)

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane
I love this book. It teaches a good lesson to kids of all ages. My grandmother passed it down to me and I've passed it down to my children.
awsome book! (02/16/09)

awsome book!
This is a great book. I really enjoyed reading it. This would be a great book if you love adventures .I give this book a 5 out of 5 ranking
Spencer (12/03/08)

Miraculous Journey is Miraculous!
This was a great book; it taught you a very good lesson. After I read it , it will forever be in my heart. People of all ages from 5 to 92 will love this book from the day they read it and forever more. There is no other book I would rather recommend. Kate DiCamillo did a very good job with this book.
Rhonda Baker (09/29/08)

Troubling and even terrifying
Lessons my daughter has learned from Edward Tulane:

Little children can cough and cough so hard that they cough up blood.

Little children can die from coughing. This is especially terrifying if you have asthma or get croup.

It’s okay to run away from home.

There are mean, mean adult people out there who crush dolls or throw them in trash heaps or smash them; who hit their children and tell them they are going to die; who throw homeless people from trains and kick dogs; who ridicule their elderly parents or refuse to let children keep a beloved toy.

The adults who do these things never ever get punished for their actions. Nothing bad happens to them at all; they just walk away scot-free.

Bad things happen, over and over again, especially to those who are young, good, and innocent; that’s just how life is. Even when you are loved.

If someone tries to cheer you up or give you hope, just ignore them and they will go away.

If someone tells you that you should just end your life, you should consider it.

Since Edward is “just a toy”, you don’t have to feel bad for him. He’s helpless. These awful things are bound to happen to those that are helpless. Like toys. Or forests. Or animals. Or children.

It's okay to be abused and miserable and pathetic and defeatist in this life because after you die it's all so lovely. You don’t really need to even try to change your attitude. In the end, it won’t matter how you lived.

Don't waste your time hoping for love because no one will love you until you're dead.

It’s okay if you never try. It’s okay if all you ever are is a victim.

Because the good news is: maybe, just maybe, in the end (whether that be the literal end of the story, or the obvious metaphorical end of life), all the torture and pain and despair and hopelessness MIGHT end well. And everything that happened won’t matter. In fact, it never did. All that matters is the ending.

These are not the lessons I want my child to learn, from this or any other book.

This is a time in history where, more than ever, I want my kids to know they are active participants in life; that they can change the world with their ideas and thoughts; that they can have hope and joy and that they are not victims.

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane is reminiscent of the old Grimm fairy tales; the old Christian tales of the bad things that happen to naughty little girls and boys; the violent and disturbing old ‘children’s’ cartoons like Tom & Jerry, and Road Runner. If I want to teach my children perseverance, I will read them Little House on the Prairie. If I want to tell them the adventures of inanimate objects without cruelty and despair (in other words, the challenges life gives us) I will read them Hitty; Her First Hundred Years. If I want her to understand death of a loved one, we’ll do Charlotte’s Web.

If I want them to learn about love, I will read them hundreds of other stories that are positive and hopeful throughout: let’s start with The Velveteen Rabbit. Maybe Edward should read The Velveteen Rabbit himself.
liv j (02/08/08)

WOW
I loved it the ending and I thought it was great how the writer ( Kate DiCamillo ) made a very detail picture of what’s happening in the reader head at all times. There wasn’t a best part in the book because it was all so good. I think there is know way anyone can improve the book cause its already too good.
James A. Lucas (01/18/08)

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane
The story of Edward quickly captured the interest of my 2 girls. From the first word to the last period, their interest was peaked with every chapter. The colorful pictures along with the written imagery, created a lasting memory.
Looking to read other books by the Kate DiCamillo!

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