Reader reviews and comments on The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane, plus links to write your own review.

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The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane

by Kate DiCamillo, Bagram Ibatoulline

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane by Kate DiCamillo, Bagram Ibatoulline
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  • First Published:
    Feb 2006, 228 pages
    Paperback:
    Jan 2008, 208 pages

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There are currently 27 reader reviews for The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane
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Mother of twin girls (04/05/11)

awesome read.
I read this book to my twin girls and we all loved it! we couldn't wait to read the next chapter and find out what would happen to Edward next. We laughed and we cried. when we finished the book we sent it to a friend, they wrote a note inside and then on to the next friend. and so on. My kids cherish that all their best friends have read it with their moms and treasure the special notes in the jacket cover. I loved it. I had a Henry that I adored.
Farah Moreau (01/29/11)

A true adventure
A true journey. So miraculous, so magical ! As a china rabbit loved by his owner Ablline tossed aboard to the net of a fisher men to the hands of a lonely child .Smashed glass on a marble counter and the to a toy store. And how love is to be shared and love is to be broken but this book shows the true meaning that love can be forgiven. I'm only 10 and this book has a special place in my heart a feeling Edward and I both share. What a wonderful story!
lover (09/23/10)

AWESOME
I love this book. It's so awesome, and I love the Tale of Desperaux too!
Crystal (03/29/10)

steals your heart
This book stole my heart I loved it. I feel almost everyone can relate to some part of this book. Edward's journeys can teach you a lot about yourself and others. This book leaves you wanting more and more.
Rose (11/30/09)

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane
I love this book. It teaches a good lesson to kids of all ages. My grandmother passed it down to me and I've passed it down to my children.
awsome book! (02/16/09)

awsome book!
This is a great book. I really enjoyed reading it. This would be a great book if you love adventures .I give this book a 5 out of 5 ranking
Spencer (12/03/08)

Miraculous Journey is Miraculous!
This was a great book; it taught you a very good lesson. After I read it , it will forever be in my heart. People of all ages from 5 to 92 will love this book from the day they read it and forever more. There is no other book I would rather recommend. Kate DiCamillo did a very good job with this book.
Rhonda Baker (09/29/08)

Troubling and even terrifying
Lessons my daughter has learned from Edward Tulane:

Little children can cough and cough so hard that they cough up blood.

Little children can die from coughing. This is especially terrifying if you have asthma or get croup.

It’s okay to run away from home.

There are mean, mean adult people out there who crush dolls or throw them in trash heaps or smash them; who hit their children and tell them they are going to die; who throw homeless people from trains and kick dogs; who ridicule their elderly parents or refuse to let children keep a beloved toy.

The adults who do these things never ever get punished for their actions. Nothing bad happens to them at all; they just walk away scot-free.

Bad things happen, over and over again, especially to those who are young, good, and innocent; that’s just how life is. Even when you are loved.

If someone tries to cheer you up or give you hope, just ignore them and they will go away.

If someone tells you that you should just end your life, you should consider it.

Since Edward is “just a toy”, you don’t have to feel bad for him. He’s helpless. These awful things are bound to happen to those that are helpless. Like toys. Or forests. Or animals. Or children.

It's okay to be abused and miserable and pathetic and defeatist in this life because after you die it's all so lovely. You don’t really need to even try to change your attitude. In the end, it won’t matter how you lived.

Don't waste your time hoping for love because no one will love you until you're dead.

It’s okay if you never try. It’s okay if all you ever are is a victim.

Because the good news is: maybe, just maybe, in the end (whether that be the literal end of the story, or the obvious metaphorical end of life), all the torture and pain and despair and hopelessness MIGHT end well. And everything that happened won’t matter. In fact, it never did. All that matters is the ending.

These are not the lessons I want my child to learn, from this or any other book.

This is a time in history where, more than ever, I want my kids to know they are active participants in life; that they can change the world with their ideas and thoughts; that they can have hope and joy and that they are not victims.

The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane is reminiscent of the old Grimm fairy tales; the old Christian tales of the bad things that happen to naughty little girls and boys; the violent and disturbing old ‘children’s’ cartoons like Tom & Jerry, and Road Runner. If I want to teach my children perseverance, I will read them Little House on the Prairie. If I want to tell them the adventures of inanimate objects without cruelty and despair (in other words, the challenges life gives us) I will read them Hitty; Her First Hundred Years. If I want her to understand death of a loved one, we’ll do Charlotte’s Web.

If I want them to learn about love, I will read them hundreds of other stories that are positive and hopeful throughout: let’s start with The Velveteen Rabbit. Maybe Edward should read The Velveteen Rabbit himself.

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