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Rich Dad, Poor Dad

What the Rich Teach Their Kids about Money--that the Poor and the Middle Class Do Not!

by Sharon L. Lechter, Robert Kiyosaki

Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Sharon L. Lechter, Robert Kiyosaki X
Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Sharon L. Lechter, Robert Kiyosaki
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    Apr 2000, 223 pages

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There are currently 6 reader reviews for Rich Dad, Poor Dad
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Sumeet shah

Changing people's thought to live
I love this book so much because it's changed my thinking how to think in a positive way and how to build my own desire.
Judson White

Avoiding the "rat race"
In the book, Rich Dad, Poor Dad, Robert T. Kiyosaki sheds light on how to stay out of debt and make your money work for you. “It’s a rat race” says Kiyosaki -“They work for the owners of their company, for the government paying taxes, and for the bank paying off a mortgage and credit cards.” He lectures and teaches that you don’t have to go and get a safe of secure job. It’s just the entrance to the “rat race”, a place that you are trying to get away from.
Kiyosaki gives some practical advice which at first seems easy, but understanding how to implement it may be more difficult. He says that the average working person works for money, even chases for the money. At a regular job a person works for their paycheck and that is as far as they will get and as much money as they will make. Kiyosaki suggest that as a working individual you need to let your money work for you. He gives a plethora of examples to how to allow your money to work for you, but one of the most important insights is to make this happen early in your career.
As pointed out in the book, times have changed in this fast paced world and so has the way to make money. The advice that is given in the book is more present and practical than most parents’ advice. The parents have grown up in a different environment when it was best to get a job in a company as a protected employee. If you don’t want to have to live from pay check week to week and month to month, you better be willing to think outside of the box.
I really enjoyed this piece of counsel; entrepreneurs have to be able to problem solve when things don’t go as planned. They need to find their niche in life and then run with it. You have to be willing to take risk if you want to get money. One of the only problems in this book is really being able to apply it to your situation. I didn’t feel like Kiyosaki really shared how to apply this to someone who is just getting out of college and trying to avoid the “rat race” altogether. Overall it was a great book with many great insights and I would recommend it to anyone trying to become wiser in business strategy. I thoroughly enjoyed it!
Elendu Obinna

knowing what is important
The middle class dream and ideal has long been society's standard for the successful individual. holding onto that point of view can have disastrous financial consequences in the years to come. Rich Dad, Poor Dad helps us distill what to strive hard for which is financial freedom, not a safe secure high paying job.
kien

this is a goodbook , i think so . Thanks .
Jayme

I have read this book many times in the course of starting, building and working my own business. It came to me as recommended reading as part of a company that helped me build my own business. It showed me a new way of thinking and how I too could be rich and not work for someone else to get that way. It's a success tool anyone who wants to gain financial freedom shouldn't be without.
Patrick McNally

Can be examined on three different levels, at least. There is the matter of internal consistency of statements within the book and they add up, there is the question of book-to-book consistency as one looks at the sequence of books which the author has by now written and checks for discrepancies and explanations, and finally there is the point of consistency with external documentation as it relates to issues touched on in the book. These matters are gone through more fully at www.johntreed.com/Kiyosaki.html, but suffice to say, the book fails on all three counts.
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