Join BookBrowse today and get access to free books, our twice monthly digital magazine, and more.

Alice LaPlante Interview, plus links to author biography, book summaries, excerpts and reviews

Alice LaPlante
Photo credit: Anne Knudsen

Alice LaPlante

How to pronounce Alice LaPlante: La Plant (the final 'e' is silent)

An interview with Alice LaPlante

Q&A with BookBrowse members and Alice La Plante about her first novel, Turn of Mind

In June 2012, BookBrowse discussed Turn of Mind. Late in the discussion the author, Alice LaPlante, joined the conversation. Below is slightly edited version of the original Q&A.


Why did you tackle this difficult subject matter in your first book. Is there someone close to you who suffers from dementia?

My mother suffered from Alzheimer's. That's actually the first time I've used that sentence in past tense, as my mother died just last week. She'd been suffering from it for more than a decade. Although there's nothing autobiographical about the book (except my maternal grandparents have a brief cameo role), I learned a lot about the disease, both by researching it as much as I could when my mother was first diagnosed, and then by observation. It's truly a terrible disease.

When I was on book tour last summer, one member of the audience stood up and said, "it's the only disease in which your loved one dies twice." While it might not be the only disease with this horrible result, I've found the saying to be otherwise true, as I thought I had reconciled myself to losing my mother years ago when she stopped recognizing us and underwent radical personality shifts. Yet her death has been very traumatic regardless.

I'd tried to write about the complexity of my thoughts and emotions from a variety of angles, but it wasn't until I had the idea for telling a story from the point of view of an actual Alzheimer's patient that I could "get at" the deep material I wanted to peruse. You could probably say that the entire book is my attempt to understand what my mother was experiencing (not that there was anything autobiographical about the novel--I wanted to explore the effect of disease on characters and relationships).


I like the way you constructed the novel and the dialogue. Did you ever get confused during the writing process? How did you keep it all straight?

No, I never did get confused....I wrote the book sequentially, as it currently is. I knew early on that it would have four main sections, each of them taking place in a different venue. Other than that, I knew nothing, nor did I plot anything out ahead of time. I just wrote the scenes as they came to me.


How difficult was it to keep the timeline straight in the novel, writing in the present and flashbacks? Did writing about a character suffering from dementia make this framework more or less difficult?

I think the fact that Jennifer had dementia made it easier to write going back and forth in time. One of my favorite writers, Alice Munro, does quite a bit of "time traveling" in her work, only using third party narrators, and I've found that very difficult to pull out. But because that's the way Jennifer mind works, it just came naturally as I wrote.


Did you have an ending in mind before you started? Was an element of dementia present at the beginning of your work? If so, why? Please address this novels' plot construction, as I am sure your readers would love to know how this novel came to be.

I tend to be a very intuitive writer. I don't plot things out ahead of time, I don't use outlines (except when a piece is done, to make sure it's structurally sound), and I don't overthink characters or events. I let my imagination lead me forward. So once I decided I was going to write about Alzheimer's from the point of view of the patient, and once I decided it would be a murder mystery, I wrote the first section which pretty much committed me to following through with a limited set of characters and a very specific crime.

As I wrote, I kept on opening "cans of worms"--potential areas of tension or conflict that might bear fruition in the mystery. I wanted to see where the mystery would go organically as the characterizations began firming up. As it was, I didn't know who had done it until 50 pages from the end! Then I went back and, surprisingly, found that almost everything was there to make it cohere.

Yes, dementia was essential to the book, as that was my main idea: to explore what the world was like through the eyes of someone inflicted with Alzheimer's. The mystery, in my opinion, was really just a secondary framework that would allow me to explore what I wanted to explore about these characters and relationships.


I felt like Mark was almost a forgotten character in the end. Was he a gambler, an alcoholic or just a spendthrift? Why did he keep borrowing money from his mother and did Fiona acknowledge her mother's note as if she really knew what she was doing and give Mark more money?

Good question. Yes SPOILER ALERT!!! in terms of the mystery, Mark didn't have any role to play in the resolution, so I just had Fiona give a summary that he's "doing better." Mark's problem was that he was a drug addict--that's why he needed money so badly that he would steal from his mother. But by the end of the book he's cleaned up his act somewhat and is acting more responsible--more responsible than Fiona, I might say!


It had been at least 3 months after the death of Amanda, yet there was blood on the medal—still? There may have been little nooks and crannies in the surface of the metal, but by the end of 3 months just in wearing, handling, and bathing that blood would have been gone. Or is there something I missed?


Yes, even though the medal has been worn, washed, touched, etc., there are now quite sophisticated blood tests that show even the faintest bit of blood. Unless someone really knows what they are doing, it's very difficult to get rid of all traces of blood, even after a significant amount of time has passed.


Many have called Amanda's death a murder. I contend it was a tragic accident, that Fiona was distraught but did not mean to kill her. What were your thoughts when writing the incident?

I suppose it is more a tragic accident than a murder, and, like so many things, the coverup was probably more of the crime than the death itself.


Some have mentioned that Jennifer is not a very likable character, and Amanda even less so. Did you like your characters? How did you feel about them?

I realize that either (or both) characters might not to be to everyone's taste. But my goal wasn't to write about sympathetic characters. My goal was to explore the effects of the terrible disease of Alzheimer's on complex individuals. This talk about whether characters need to be "sympathetic" comes up in writing classes all the time. I have always contended that characters need to be interesting, but not necessarily likeable, for fiction to succeed.

Unless otherwise stated, this interview was conducted at the time the book was first published, and is reproduced with permission of the publisher. This interview may not be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the copyright holder.

Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" articles
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $45 for 12 months or $15 for 3 months.
  • More about membership!

Books by this Author

Books by Alice LaPlante at BookBrowse
Half Moon Bay jacket Coming of Age at the End of Days jacket A Circle of Wives jacket Turn of Mind jacket
Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" articles
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $45 for 12 months or $15 for 3 months.
  • More about membership!

Read-Alikes

All the books below are recommended as read-alikes for Alice LaPlante but some maybe more relevant to you than others depending on which books by the author you have read and enjoyed. So look for the suggested read-alikes by title linked on the right.
How we choose readalikes

  • Deborah Carol Gang

    Deborah Carol Gang

    The short fiction of Deborah Carol Gang has been published in Literarymama, Bluestem Journal and The Driftless Review.

    Her poetry has appeared in JJournal/CUNY, New Verse News, The Michigan Poet, Arsenic Lobster, and The ... (more)

    If you enjoyed:
    Turn of Mind

    Try:
    The Half-Life of Everything
    by Deborah Carol Gang

  • Carol Cassella

    Carol Cassella

    Carol Cassella, MD, is a practicing anesthesiologist, novelist, and speaker. She majored in English Literature at Duke University and attended Baylor College of Medicine. She is the bestselling author of the novels Oxygen and... (more)

    If you enjoyed:
    Turn of Mind

    Try:
    Gemini
    by Carol Cassella

We recommend 11 similar authors


Non-members can see 2 results. Become a member
Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" articles
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $45 for 12 months or $15 for 3 months.
  • More about membership!

Support BookBrowse

Join our inner reading circle, go ad-free and get way more!

Find out more


Top Picks

  • Book Jacket: Women and Children First
    Women and Children First
    by Alina Grabowski
    After Lucy Anderson falls to her death at a high school party, no one in Nashquitten, her gloomy, ...
  • Book Jacket: Henry Henry
    Henry Henry
    by Allen Bratton
    Allen Bratton's Henry Henry chronicles a year in the life of Hal Lancaster. Readers already ...
  • Book Jacket: The Last Murder at the End of the World
    The Last Murder at the End of the World
    by Stuart Turton
    The island is the only safe place left on Earth. Since a deadly fog overtook the planet, the ...
  • Book Jacket
    A Kind of Madness
    by Uche Okonkwo
    The word "madness," like many others that can be used to stigmatize mental illness — e.g., "...

BookBrowse Book Club

Book Jacket
The Pecan Children
by Quinn Connor
Two sisters deeply tied to their small Southern town fight to break free of the darkness swallowing the land whole.
Book Jacket
Look on the Bright Side
by Kristan Higgins
From the author of Pack Up the Moon comes a funny, romantic, and moving novel about life's unexpected rewards.
Win This Book
Win Bright and Tender Dark

Bright and Tender Dark by Joanna Pearson

A beautifully written, wire-taut debut novel about a murder on a college campus and its aftermath twenty years later.

Enter

Wordplay

Solve this clue:

A W in S C

and be entered to win..

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends the best in contemporary fiction and nonfiction—books that not only engage and entertain but also deepen our understanding of ourselves and the world around us.