MLA Platinum Award Press Release

Reader reviews and comments on Year of Wonders, plus links to write your own review.

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Year of Wonders

A Novel of The Plague

by Geraldine Brooks

Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks X
Year of Wonders by Geraldine Brooks
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  • First Published:
    Aug 2001, 352 pages
    Paperback:
    Apr 2002, 320 pages

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There are currently 25 reader reviews for Year of Wonders
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Vanessa

Everything
This book was more of a story from a girl who learns so much but I also liked it because I noticed something that no one else did. I saw that this wonderful girl had love but also had faith. Imagine yourself as her being forced into all the things she did or having freedom? Ask me that, show me how good this book is to you.
Katherine

Anything
This was a rather intriguing book but I found myself asking for more content. I also found some of the things in this book hard to believe and much of it common knowledge for anyone who would read a minor passage on the plague. I was looking for forward to the confusion of the human mind during times of hardship and most of it was only the same ideas as within every plague but not much in depth I guess. The ending was rather brilliantly crafted and I like how it leaves a rather satisfying ending.
Lauren Ominski

Year Of Wonders
This book is good, i think that the second time you read it, it will be much better and more understandable. Masterpiece
Kathy Huynh

an imaginatively profound read
I've just finished re reading the book for the second time and thought to look it up for other opinions on this book. i found this novel peacefully subtle yet compelling. The intriguing characters that have been beautifully woven in this fiction endure shattered virtues yet displays a humilty that touches us. No pages dragged and overall a great read.


Luminously written, Year of Wonders takes us back to 1665 England, where a tiny countryside village is in the throes of the Black Plague. Based on a true story, we meet the brave souls, particulary Ana Frith, who struggle against the urge to flee. The village vows to remain together, cut off from the outside world so as to contain the contagion. It has me in thrall, as I contemplate what life must have been like in those times, especially in the face of such desperation.
Jenna

Alright...
I don't think that this book was anything spectactular, but I liked the end. Although it is gruesome at some points I thought it was beautifully written. The last chapter was my favorite part, and I don't think I will read it again, but I am glad I at least read it once
Steve Bonebrake

Year of Wonders is a decent book. Although people die and the descriptions of death vulgar, many of the things that happen make you feel good and connect with the characters. I give this book a rating of "3" because it is an average fiction book. I think the plot could have been better. Also the main character, Anna Frith, is unbelievably intelligent for a female English servant in the 17th century. If read carefully you can pick up an underlying hint of feminist sentiment from the author.
Karen Williams

Too Much Imagination
Much to the disappointment of anyone with even a slim knowledge of 17th century England, Geraldine Brooks inserts a modern liberal heroine into a pre-modern culture. I found myself laughing at the author's brazen and unruly use of imagination. This is a work of fantasy which seldom touches even the truth of fiction. The real story of the real plague village and its priest is more interesting and astounding. It is only fair to mention that Brooks is a fine wordsmith and some of her scenes are on the mark and beautifully written! If you don't know history, you will probably enjoy the book.

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