Reader reviews and comments on All the Light We Cannot See, plus links to write your own review.

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reading Guide |  Reviews |  Beyond the book |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

All the Light We Cannot See

by Anthony Doerr

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • Published:
    May 2014, 448 pages

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
Naomi Benaron

Buy This Book

About this Book

Reviews

Page 1 of 1
There are currently 4 reader reviews for All the Light We Cannot See
Order Reviews by:

Write your own review!

Kay (03/29/15)

Too confusing the last quarter of the book.
I really liked over half of the book, but then it to me was too confusing. It kept jumping back and forth in time and place.
Linda B. (02/03/15)

"All the Light We Cannot See"
This book mesmerized me. I just finished it -- am in a profound daze and having trouble reorienting myself to my date, time, place, and life. It is one of the most compelling books I've ever read.
S.L. B. (01/12/15)

One of the very best books I have read
When I saw this book, I was attracted to it being about a blind girl in World War 2 but the book has bought so much to me. It has bought a more lively sense of awareness about the war, how it really was. The short chapters were like a breath of fresh air...no long details, it was more interesting that way, at least to me.

I will not give a spoiler alert to the ending but the book tended to be a bit predictable in a way but then twists you in the ending that leaves you sad but still satisfied that you read it.

I will tell people about this book and I have done just that.

Anthony Doerr...a truly fantastic book of 2014 and a good read into 2015.
Barbara (06/01/14)

A Surprise
I had not read anything by Anthony Doerr prior to this book. I simply picked it up because it looked interesting. I was very impressed. Almost every two pages switches from one main character, the blind French girl, to the other main character, Werner, the young German boy. The story does not run chronologically either. In the beginning it is 1944; later it is 1942 then back to 1944. This writer manages to make all of this work without ever leaving the reader confused.

The characters are so well developed the reader feels close to them and likes most of them. The book is poetic and yet realistic.

The blind girl's father may be carrying a fantastic diamond from the Paris Museum of Natural History. He and the girl escape to St. Malo, where the boy of 16 is sent as a soldier in the German army. St. Malo is the last bastion of the German defense, and they are under attack.

The boy manages to save the girl from a German searching for the diamond after the arrest of her uncle and father. The ending is not a romantic ending. It is realistic, complex, and most interesting reading.
  • Page
  • 1

Beyond the Book:
  Saint Malo

Support BookBrowse

Become a Member and discover books that entertain, engage & enlighten!

Join Today!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: Lincoln in the Bardo
    Lincoln in the Bardo
    by George Saunders
    George Saunders' Lincoln in the Bardo is a philosophy discourse brilliantly disguised as a ...
  • Book Jacket
    Tender
    by Belinda McKeon
    Most of us have heard the slightly trite saying: "If you love something, set it free." But one can ...
  • Book Jacket
    All Tomorrow's Parties
    by Rob Spillman
    In this absorbing memoir, co-founder of Tin House magazine, Rob Spillman, recalls his artistic ...

Book Discussion
Book Jacket
The Sellout
by Paul Beatty

The first book by an American author to win the prestigious Man Booker Prize.

About the book
Join the discussion!

First Impressions

  • Book Jacket

    The Fifth Petal
    by Brunonia Barry

    Beloved author Brunonia Barry returns to the world of The Lace Reader with this spellbinding new thriller.
    Reader Reviews

  • Book Jacket

    I See You
    by Clare Mackintosh

    A dark and compelling thriller about an everyday woman trapped in the confines of her everyday world.
    Reader Reviews

Who Said...

A library, to modify the famous metaphor of Socrates, should be the delivery room for the birth of ideas--a place ...

Click Here to find out who said this, as well as discovering other famous literary quotes!

Word Play

Solve this clue:

K Your F C

and be entered to win..

Books that     
entertain,
     engage

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends books that we believe to be best in class. Books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, that will expand your mind and challenge you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.