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What readers think of The Weight of Heaven, plus links to write your own review.

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reading Guide |  Reviews |  Beyond the book |  Read-Alikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

The Weight of Heaven

A Novel

by Thrity Umrigar

The Weight of Heaven by Thrity Umrigar X
The Weight of Heaven by Thrity Umrigar
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    Apr 2009, 384 pages

    Paperback:
    Feb 2010, 400 pages

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Book Reviewed by:
Kim Kovacs
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There are currently 3 reader reviews for The Weight of Heaven
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Pam

Excellent read
Thrity Umrigar is my new favorite author. This is the third of her books (in a row!) I have read now, and each have been unique, powerful, and wonderful reads. The author is a great story-teller, character developer, and plot line weaver. What talent!
This story involves the lives of an American couple who lose their only son, and try to repair their hearts and marriage with a fresh start in India only to find themselves at odds with each other's political views and an involvement with another bright young boy. Their tragic beginning unfortunately leads to an even more tragic ending as they handle (and do not handle) grief in their own divergent ways.
Kathryn

Great Book Club Selection
Fans of Umrigar will not be disappointed. The Weight of Heaven
is a beautifully written story about an American couple suffering the loss of their only child, Hoping to find some some comfort and closure, Frank and Ellie move to India where he runs an American company. What may be unsettling to some readers is the intense struggle they encounter in their grieving.

This is not a 'feel good' book. It is also fair to say that Umrigar delivers a strong political message. The 'ugly American' is alive and well in the outsourced business Frank operates. The observations are real and there is no doubt about the image portrayed. It also gives insight into the culture of India. The uncomfortable truth in this story may be a hard swallow for some. It is thought provoking however and will make for a great discussion for a book club.
TonyiaR

Privileged White Americans in Foreign Lands
This a very sad and tragic story. Where everything and the people with power were wrong. The first time I read the book I was appalled how governments of other countries sale to the highest bidder their resources to Americans or other western “white” cultures. And as much as the family was grieving the death of their own son, the father, Frank, felt entitled to offer any non-white child a better quality of living (not life). The child’s parents gave life and can choose wisely the best opportunities for their child. And he eventually loss more than he has bargain for. The second time I read the book (was around time I loss my mom) their grief, the weight of it. I really didn’t catch how much the husband blamed his wife for his pain, that she could have done better in saving their own child. I wonder how much subconsciously he wanted his wife to feel the weight of his loss until she was gone herself. Their attitudes toward the Hindu and Muslim Indians was so patronizing that I disliked both Ellie and Frank where the first time I only disliked Frank. Especially for him to wanting something else which didn’t belong to him. Why do so many whites feel so privileged and assume their culture is more superior, right or good. That everyone wants what they have. It is sad and arrogant.
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