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Middlesex

by Jeffrey Eugenides

Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides X
Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    Sep 2002, 544 pages
    Paperback:
    Sep 2003, 544 pages

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There are currently 15 reader reviews for Middlesex
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shubhamvada mathur

Eugenides writes in a very pleasing style, the book captured my interest from the very first page. It isn't everyday a preconceptual embryo talks to you! The best attribute of this book is its multidimensionality-instead of focussing on the personal experience, it draws on medicine, history, contemporary & ethnic cultures to narrate an intensely personal story that darts freely between the past and present, I thought this style wonderfully emphasised how tightly the two were intertwined in this story.
Miriam

Just didn't like it
I am glad to read one person called Lucas calling this book mediocre. It is mediocre. I love reading and I didn't finish this book. I am an open minded person but sex between brother and sister is not in my list of acceptable behaviour.
kay

What's all the praise for???
I could hardly wait to finish this novel, not because it was so good, but because it was sooooo long.The story got lost in its over 500 pages of narrative, internal pov, Cal's pov & everyone else's pov, confusing back-story, jumping around in time & pov. Historical part the best. Tried to cover too much. How did this win a prize???
Tess Peer

Quickie
What is the symbolic function of the house?
Lucas

"Middle" is the key word here; this novel is mediocre. Eugenides is not a bad writer, but he seems unable to review his own work with a critical eye. "Middlesex" feels strung-together, as if every idea were used, without any internal cohesion.

Many geographical locations are mentioned in the book, they are talked about and described from the point of view of a Dickensian external narrator, but neither Berlin nor Detroit affect the prose with their essence.

kssteffe

I loved this book and I hated it to end. Also, Chapter 11 got his name because he put the hot dog stands into bankruptcy.
chris

Why is Cal's brother named 'Chapter Eleven'. It is driving me crazy
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