Reader reviews and comments on The Diving Bell and The Butterfly, plus links to write your own review.

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The Diving Bell and The Butterfly

A Memoir of Life in Death

by Jean-Dominique Bauby

The Diving Bell and The Butterfly by Jean-Dominique Bauby
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  • First Published:
    May 1997, 144 pages
    Paperback:
    Jun 1998, 144 pages

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There are currently 9 reader reviews for The Diving Bell and The Butterfly
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Agrippah (02/13/08)

Bauby's book voices a caged bird
I came across this book about eight years ago. I have seen quite many since then. But the contents of this one always cross my mind more than once every day.The circumstances were beyond difficult. Jean-Dominique proved that the attack was less of a blow than a challenge.

Instead of self-pity, Bauby used the last days of his life to leave behind a masterpiece. It reminds one of a bird in a cage, surely aware that the worst may be knocking at any time, yet patient and extremely considerate to spend their last energy entertaining those who are happily free. This is a work of indescribable dedication. Where there is a will there is a way. Read this book and you will never again debate this quote.
Peter (09/04/04)

Surrounded by thousands of books, none have informed me more about the human spirit than this beautiful expression of life. Bauby has given me a hand to hold, a conversation to continue.
Rabbi Steve (07/16/04)

Originally this book was recommended to me by a vp from Ford Motor Co. I picked it up and was overwhelmed with guilt over the persistant pity parties I hosted. How a man, not deeply religious, but full of faith, endured so long and so successfully after a personal holocaust is moving. In both his eyes and ours, Bauby is a success in the material and personal. The stroke is a setback, but not defeat. Perhaps his greatest triumph was the freedom he enjoyed being crippled. His communication is not melancholy but truthful in the facts of his affliction. A fine read.
Shane (11/26/03)

Quite simply a marvellous book that belongs on everyones bookshelf - be they Doctors or nurses, Builders or Lawyers. This is one of very few books that I can continually re-read. The words "triumph of the human spirit" could have been written with this book in mind. It serves to remind us of the fleetingness of life and of the power of that human spirit. I teach Karate to young and old and while trying to instill a never quit attitude I find the simplest way is to recommend this book to all my students. If you dont already own it then go and buy it now. If you do already own then take it down off the shelf and read it again - enough said. Osu!
Simon, Nurse (10/24/03)

This book made me think of all the times when maybe we get tired of doing the same old things for patients. We get complacent and forget that they are living human beings. The way some nurses talk over patients whilst 'caring' for them is awful but happens all the time. I think of this book and the author every time I work with clients like him.
Kathy (06/12/03)

A wonderful book and a wonderful achievement of the human spirit.

Should be required reading by ALL doctors, nurses,physios and anyone dealing with patients who are unable to communicate with them in the normal way.
SigrĂșn (04/07/03)

A wonderful book that definitely makes you wonder if modern science and doctors haven't strayed a bit too far...
Connie Altarejos-Lee (02/12/03)

I read the book simply to experience the author's feelings. In my research on the subject of coma, I stumbled to this book. I am interested in the subject because my older sister is in a coma. I am amazed by Jean's great achievement in writing this book. For a non-French person like, I learned some brief lessons on the French language, history and geography. What a moving experience!
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