Sami Religion: Background information when reading Forty Days Without Shadow

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reviews |  Beyond the Book |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

Forty Days Without Shadow

An Arctic Thriller

by Olivier Truc

Forty Days Without Shadow by Olivier Truc X
Forty Days Without Shadow by Olivier Truc
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    Nov 2014, 480 pages
    Nov 2014, 480 pages

  • Rate this book

Book Reviewed by:
Poornima Apte

Buy This Book

About this Book

Beyond the Book:
Sami Religion

Print Review

Sami ShamanForty Days Without Shadow sheds light on the native Sami people of northern Norway, most of whom are Lutherans. The Sami also take part in shamanic rituals that emphasize strong connections between the natural and spiritual worlds, although Christianity has been slowly making inroads over the centuries forcing the practice of the native religion underground.

A central aspect of the Sami shamanic rituals is the usage of drums as a conduit to channel spirits. The Sami also used a drum to forecast weather and other natural events. In fact, Mattis Labba, the Sami who is killed in the story, has ancestors who were skilled in such practices. They channeled higher spirits through use of a drum, a skill Labba did not fully learn, even though he was an expert drum maker.

Sami DrumWith the accelerating encroachment of Christianity in the 18th centuery, however, these drums became an endangered species. Since the drums were such a central aspect of the Sami religion, they stood out as ready targets in the culture war between local shamanic rituals and the native Sami on one side, and the Christians on the other. As the goal became to save the "heathens" with Christianity, the shamanic practices came under attack and getting rid of the drum seemed to be the best way to go about things.To that end, many drums were systematically destroyed, although a few have survived in homes or as part of museum collections.

SamiIncidentally, the prologue for Forty Days Without Shadow, set in 1693, in central Lapland, features a native being burned at the stake for his "pagan" beliefs. Along with such "witchcraft" purges, when the Scandinavians brought Christianity with them, laws were passed to bring the unfaithful over. A formal church for the Sami was instituted by royal decree at the end of the seventeenth century. Lars Levi Laestadius (1800-1861), a half Sami man, was key in bringing Lutheranism to the Sami. A polymath, Laestadius could deliver sermons in native dialects, which was instrumental in converting the non-believers. Due to the vast landscape of the tundra and the Sami's nomadic lifestyle, church-going is reserved for special occasions. Laestadianism is a particularly conservative branch of Lutheranism. The novel describes that followers are not allowed to wear makeup or even hang curtains on windows.

Photo-journalist Erika Larsen spent three years living with the Sami and documenting their lives for National Geographic magazine. She describes the experience in a related article in The New York Times. The accompanying slideshow is worth exploring.

A copper carving (1767) by O.H. von Lode showing a Sami shaman with his rune drum, courtesy of Skogsfrun
Sami drum, courtesy of Andreas Praefcke
Sami in Norway, 1928, courtesy of Thorguds

Article by Poornima Apte

This article is from the January 21, 2015 issue of BookBrowse Recommends. Click here to go to this issue.

This article is available to non-members for a limited time. You can also read these articles for free. For full access, become a member today.
Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" backstories
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $10 for 3 months or $35 for a year
  • More about membership!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: Eat the Apple
    Eat the Apple
    by Matt Young
    Truth is stranger than fiction. Matt Young's memoir tackles the space in between truth and ...
  • Book Jacket: Educated
    by Tara Westover
    Tara Westover had the kind of upbringing most of us can only imagine. She was the youngest of seven ...
  • Book Jacket: The Girls in the Picture
    The Girls in the Picture
    by Melanie Benjamin
    Melanie Benjamin's fine historical novel about the relationship between two women in the early ...
  • Book Jacket: The Driest Season
    The Driest Season
    by Meghan Kenny
    On a summer afternoon in 1943, an almost sixteen-year-old Cielle Jacobson walks into the family barn...

First Impressions

  • Book Jacket

    Auntie Poldi and the Sicilian Lions
    by Mario Giordano

    A charming, bighearted novel starring Auntie Poldi, Sicily's newest amateur sleuth.
    Reader Reviews

  • Book Jacket

    The House of Broken Angels
    by Luis Alberto Urrea

    The definitive Mexican-American immigrant story from an acclaimed storyteller.
    Reader Reviews

Win this book!
Win The Balcony

The Balcony
by Jane Delury

A century-spanning novel-in-stories of a French village brimming with compassion, natural beauty, and unmistakable humanity.


Word Play

Solve this clue:

I Y L D W D, Y'll G U W Fleas

and be entered to win..

Books that     

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends books that we believe to be best in class. Books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, that will expand your mind and challenge you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.