The Influence of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Emile on Thomas Day: Background information when reading How to Create the Perfect Wife

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reviews |  Beyond the Book |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

How to Create the Perfect Wife

Britain's Most Ineligible Bachelor and his Enlightened Quest to Train the Ideal Mate

by Wendy Moore

How to Create the Perfect Wife by Wendy Moore X
How to Create the Perfect Wife by Wendy Moore
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

     Not Yet Rated
  • Published:
    Apr 2013, 368 pages

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
Norah Piehl

Buy This Book

About this Book

Beyond the Book:
The Influence of Jean-Jacques Rousseau's Emile on Thomas Day

Print Review

Jean-Jacques RousseauWendy Moore illustrates the various cultural influences that led to Thomas Day's peculiar experiment. Among these are the Pygmalion myth (later popularized in George Bernard Shaw's play by that name, as well as the musical, My Fair Lady, based on Shaw's play) and, perhaps most influentially, Jean-Jacques Rousseau's book, Emile, or On Education. First published in 1762, the educational treatise uses novelistic conventions (such as character and plot) to illustrate Rousseau's theories on the best way for the individual to retain innate goodness while still participating as a functioning member of society. It's divided into five parts, beginning with very young childhood and eventually exploring the ideal route for the individual to choose a trade, become a productive member of society, and choose a spouse - sort of a roadmap for how to balance the state of nature with the demands of society.

Frontispiece to Rousseau's <i>Émile</i> by de Launay for the 1782 editionRousseau's book, as Moore mentions, was not intended to serve as any kind of parenting model, however it does contain a great deal of very specific advice, such as the prioritization of observation and interaction with nature over any kind of conventional academic education in early childhood. Rousseau also advocates the strengthening of the child's body through exposure to the elements. Instruction in more abstract topics such as philosophy and religion, he says, should only be embarked upon once the adolescent has fully developed reason and rationality. It's not surprising, given the specificity in Rousseau's work, that some eighteenth-century parents, including Day's good friend Edgeworth, decided to put Rousseau's ideas to the test, with unintended and sometimes detrimental results.

More controversially, at least in hindsight, were Rousseau's views on women espoused in Emile, particularly in the section on the development of Sophie, Emile's ideal mate. About women, Rousseau writes, "In what they have in common, they are equal. Where they differ, they are not comparable. A perfect woman and a perfect man ought not to resemble each other in mind any more than in looks." Rousseau's laissez-faire approach to education for boys is turned on its head when it comes to young Sophie, who apparently requires a far more structured education, one that stresses domestic arts, traditional handicrafts, and, most importantly, helping her realize her potential to "please man." Moore includes a portrait of Thomas Day, in which he holds a book in one hand, widely believed to be Rousseau's Emile. It's interesting to trace, in How To Create A Perfect Wife, how Day uses Rousseau's philosophy to suit his own ends.

Frontispiece to Rousseau's Émile by de Launay for the 1782 edition. The original caption read: "L'éducation de l'homme commence à sa naissance" ("A man's education begins at birth"). "In the foreground, a mother dutifully reads Émile as she breastfeeds one baby and changes another. Her daughter looks on, eager to learn from her mother's example. They are seated in a forest clearing at the foot of a pedestal bearing a larger than life bust of Rousseau, who by the 1780s had become a kind of patron saint for nursing mothers...In the background are scenes from Émile's childhood." (Quote from Mary Seidman Trouille. Sexual Politics in the Enlightenment: Women Writers Read Rousseau. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1997)

Article by Norah Piehl

This article is from the May 8, 2013 issue of BookBrowse Recommends. Click here to go to this issue.

This article is available to non-members for a limited time. You can also read these articles for free. For full access, become a member today.
Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" backstories
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $10 for 3 months or $35 for a year
  • More about membership!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: The Overstory
    The Overstory
    by Richard Powers
    Many glowing adjectives can be used to describe a novel by Richard Powers: brilliant, moving, ...
  • Book Jacket: American Histories
    American Histories
    by John E. Wideman
    In American Histories, a collection of 21 short stories, John Edgar Wideman draws America's present ...
  • Book Jacket: I Found My Tribe
    I Found My Tribe
    by Ruth Fitzmaurice
    Ruth O'Neill was only 28 when she married film director Simon Fitzmaurice in 2004. Changing her...
  • Book Jacket: The Art of the Wasted Day
    The Art of the Wasted Day
    by Patricia Hampl
    Patricia Hampl wants you to know that daydreaming is not a waste of a day. Nor is spending time ...

Book Discussion
Book Jacket
Music of the Ghosts by Vaddey Ratner

A love story for things lost and restored, a lyrical hymn to the power of forgiveness.

About the book
Join the discussion!

Readers Recommend

  • Book Jacket

    The Girl Who Smiled Beads
    by Clemantine Wamariya & Elizabeth Weil

    A riveting story of survival, and the power of stories to save us.
    Reader Reviews

Win this book!
Win The Leavers

The Leavers by Lisa Ko

One of the most anticipated books of 2017--now in paperback!

Enter

Word Play

Solve this clue:

T E H N Clothes

and be entered to win..

Books that     
entertain,
     engage

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends books that we believe to be best in class. Books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, that will expand your mind and challenge you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.