R.J. Palacio's Inspiration for Wonder: Background information when reading Wonder

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reviews |  Beyond the Book |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

Wonder

by R.J. Palacio

Wonder by R.J. Palacio
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • Published:
    Feb 2012, 320 pages

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
Tamara Smith

Buy This Book

About this Book

Beyond the Book:
R.J. Palacio's Inspiration for Wonder

Print Review

Whatever you're thinking, it's probably worse.

This is Auggie's statement on page one of Wonder about the appearance of his face. R.J. Palacio (whose real name is Raquel Jaramillo... Palacio is her mother's last name) makes a very conscious choice not to explore Auggie's disfigurement head-on, and I think it's a good one. Instead, she allows the reader to create her own images and then, very slowly and from a slanted sort of angle, Palacio gives details. Because at the heart of issue is, well, Auggie's heart, and that is all that matters.

I don't want to dishonor Palacio's choice, but I will give you a bit of information about Auggie's condition. He has something called Mandibulofacial Dysostosis, which is more typically known as Treacher Collins Syndrome (after famous British ophthalmologist Edward Treacher Collins who recorded the description of this syndrome in a paper in 1900.) It is a hereditary condition caused by a defective protein called treacle. It affects approximately one in 50,000 births. Its symptoms and characteristics vary from person to person, and can be so minor is it hardly discernable, or very severe - like with Auggie. It always affects facial features and functions, such as abnormally formed ears and thus hearing loss. Intelligence is not usually affected, and children with Treacher Collins Syndrome commonly grow to be fully and normally functioning adults.

Why did Palacio choose to write a novel about a boy with this syndrome? As she says on her website:

About five years ago I took my kids to visit a friend of mine who lives out of town, and at some point during the day we found ourselves sitting next to a little girl who looked the way Auggie looks in the book. We were in front of an ice cream shop, and she was sitting next to us with her mother and a friend. My younger son was only about three at the time, and he reacted exactly the way you might think a three-year old would react when seeing something that scared him: he started to cry - pretty loudly, too. And though my older son, who was ten at the time, knew better than to stare, his expression said it all despite his best efforts: he looked like someone had just punched him. It was terrible, on all counts, and I got up as quickly as I could to remove us from the scene - not for their sakes, of course, but to spare the little's girl's feelings. As I pushed my younger son's stroller away I heard the little girls' mom say, in as sweet and calm a voice as you can imagine: "Okay, guys, I think it's time to go." And that just got to me.

That scene played out in Palacio's head - over and over again - as she drove home that day. She couldn't stop thinking about that little girl and the countless stares and sideways glances and rude comments that she must have to endure day after day. Palacio wondered what she could teach her two children that would help them understand how to respond better to an encounter like the one they had just experienced. And then Natalie Merchant's song Wonder came on the car radio (lyrics here), and Palacio had her book. She said, "The book kind of wrote itself in my head on that drive home. I would write the story from the child's point of view. It would help people understand - not pity. I'm just like you, the child would say. I'm an ordinary kid - except for this one thing. And I would call the book Wonder because this child is a wonder."

R.J. Palacio was a book jacket designer and art director for many years before taking the plunge into writing this first novel. And it was a plunge! A middle of the night plunge. For one year, Palacio would come home from work, make dinner, help her kids with homework, go to bed, and then get up at midnight to write for two hours before going back to bed again. Talk about a wonder!

Article by Tamara Smith

This article is from the June 14, 2012 issue of BookBrowse Recommends. Click here to go to this issue.

This article is available to non-members for a limited time. You can also read these articles for free. For full access become a member today.

Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" backstories
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $10 for 3 months or $35 for a year
  • More about membership!

One-Month Free Membership

Discover your next great read here

Join Today!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: Goodbye Days
    Goodbye Days
    by Jeff Zentner
    Guilt can be a heavy burden for anyone to manage, but it's especially difficult for teenagers. ...
  • Book Jacket: The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley
    The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley
    by Hannah Tinti
    Hannah Tinti follows her spectacular 2008 debut, The Good Thief, with a novel of uncommon ...
  • Book Jacket: Music of the Ghosts
    Music of the Ghosts
    by Vaddey Ratner
    Music of the Ghosts is about healing and forgiveness, but it is also about identity and the revival ...

Book Discussion
Book Jacket
The Nest
by Cynthia D'Aprix Sweeney

A funny and acutely perceptive debut about four siblings and the fate of their shared inheritance.

About the book
Join the discussion!

First Impressions

  • Book Jacket

    No One Is Coming to Save Us
    by Stephanie Powell Watts

    One of Entertainment Weekly, Nylon and Elle's most anticipated books of 2017.
    Reader Reviews

  • Book Jacket

    The Stars Are Fire
    by Anita Shreve

    An exquisitely suspenseful novel about an extraordinary young woman tested by a catastrophic event.
    Reader Reviews

Who Said...

In youth we run into difficulties. In old age difficulties run into us

Click Here to find out who said this, as well as discovering other famous literary quotes!

Word Play

Solve this clue:

Y S M B, I'll S Y

and be entered to win..

Books that     
entertain,
     engage

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends books that we believe to be best in class. Books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, that will expand your mind and challenge you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.

 
Modal popup -