Reviews of The Serpent's Tale by Ariana Franklin

The Serpent's Tale

by Ariana Franklin

The Serpent's Tale by Ariana Franklin X
The Serpent's Tale by Ariana Franklin
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  • First Published:
    Jan 2008, 384 pages

    Paperback:
    Feb 2009, 416 pages

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Book Reviewed by:
Kathy Pierson
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About this Book

Book Summary

Ariana Franklin combines the best of modern forensic thrillers with the drama of historical fiction in her second novel in the Mistress of the Art of Death series, featuring medieval heroine Adelia Aguilar.

Ariana Franklin combines the best of modern forensic thrillers with the drama of historical fiction in the enthralling second novel in the Mistress of the Art of Death series, featuring medieval heroine Adelia Aguilar.

Rosamund Clifford, the mistress of King Henry II, has died an agonizing death by poison - and the king's estranged queen, Eleanor of Aquitaine, is the prime suspect. Henry suspects that Rosamund's murder is probably the first move in Eleanor's long-simmering plot to overthrow him. If Eleanor is guilty, the result could be civil war. The king must once again summon Adelia Aguilar, mistress of the art of death, to uncover the truth.

Adelia is not happy to be called out of retirement. She has been living contentedly in the countryside, caring for her infant daughter, Allie. But Henry's summons cannot be ignored, and Adelia must again join forces with the king's trusted fixer, Rowley Picot, the Bishop of St. Albans, who is also her baby's father.

Adelia and Rowley travel to the murdered courtesan's home, in a tower within a walled labyrinth - a strange and sinister place from the outside, but far more so on the inside, where a bizarre and gruesome discovery awaits them. But Adelia's investigation is cut short by the appearance of Rosamund's rival: Queen Eleanor. Adelia, Rowley, and the other members of her small party are taken captive by Eleanor's henchmen and held in the nunnery of Godstow, where Eleanor is holed up for the winter with her band of mercenaries, awaiting the right moment to launch their rebellion.

Isolated and trapped inside the nunnery by the snow and cold, Adelia and Rowley watch as dead bodies begin piling up. Adelia knows that there may be more than one killer at work, and she must unveil their true identities before England is once again plunged into civil war . . .

PROLOGUE

The two men's voices carried down the tunnels with reverberations that made them indistinguishable but, even so, gave the impression of a business meeting. Which it was. In a way.

An assassin was receiving orders from his client, who was, the assassin thought, making it unnecessarily difficult for himself, as such clients did.

It was always the same; they wanted to conceal their identities, and turned up so masked or muffled you could hardly hear their instructions. They didn't want to be seen with you, which led to assignations on blasted heaths or places like this stinking cellar. They were nervous about handing over the down payment in case you stabbed them and then ran off with it.

If they only realized it, a respectable assassin like himself had to be trustworthy; his career depended on it. It had taken time, but Sicarius (the Latin pseudonym he'd chosen for himself ) was becoming known for excellence. Whether it was translated from the Latin ...

Please be aware that this discussion guide may contain spoilers!
High in the upper chamber of Wormhold Tower—a monolithic structure located in the countryside of medieval Oxfordshire—a woman lies dying. Having exhausted her prayers to God, the attending nun, Sister Havis of nearby Godstow Abbey, calls for a priest to administer last rites. The dying woman's pathologically devoted servant, Dame Dakers, appeals to a different power to save her master's life, performing a ritual sacrifice to the Devil. But neither God nor the Devil can rescue the woman from an agonizing death, or shield England from the political firestorm that is sure to follow. For the woman writhing in her deathbed is Rosamund Clifford, famed mistress of King Henry II, and her death is no accident. And with ...
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Reviews

BookBrowse Review

BookBrowse

The events of this novel involve historical personages including Henry Plantagenet, Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine, Henry's mistress Rosamund Clifford, and others. Adelia is an independent, courageous, and mentally forceful woman, and her insertion into this tapestry of the Middle Ages at times seems a bit of a stretch. Some will quibble that Franklin's writing and dialogue slip as often into modern phrasings as into a quaint East Anglican brogue. The sentence structures can be difficult to follow, and the writing tone doesn't always align with the 12th-century setting of the novel. However, these things being said, The Serpent's Tale is a fun and engaging fiction set in an interesting and tumultuous period of English history that has received much less literary attention than the overdone Tudor period. Visiting this unfamiliar era, and then following research trails afterward, rewarded me with many new facts and background histories. This book should appeal to those who enjoy strong female characters, medically-based crime solving, or British mysteries and intrigues...continued

Full Review (571 words).

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(Reviewed by Kathy Pierson).

Media Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
The careful clinician of the first book has become a passionate woman and worried mother, exoticism and novelty traded for a greater range of emotion. A warm, promising continuation of the series.

Publishers Weekly
A colorful cast of characters, both good and evil, enhance a tale that will keep readers on edge until the final page.

Reader Reviews

Gloria

The Serpent's Tale
I fell in love with the characters when I read "The Mistress of the art of Death" , they are believable, funny, with all the human failings one could possibly have. The story lines are engaging and I spent a couple sleepless nights because ...   Read More
joey

unremarkable
The story is somewhat predictable.
Kim

So-So mystery
I absolutely LOVED Ariana Franklin's first book in this series, "Mistress in the Art of Death," and couldn't wait to read "Serpent's Tale." Unfortunately, Franklin's second book is just kind of average. It dithers around a lot without moving the ...   Read More

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Beyond the Book

A Plantagenet Primer

Henry II (1133-1189), the first Plantagenet* king, was born and brought up in France but lived to rule England for 35 years. His name will always be tied obliquely to the murder of Archbishop Thomas à Becket at Canterbury Cathedral in 1170, even though he's often lauded as one of the most effective of all England's monarchs. In The Serpent's Tale, Adelia is annoyed by the memory of Becket's murder, which made "a martyred saint out of a brave but stupid and blinkered man" at the expense of a king who wanted to "allow greater justice to his people with laws more fair, and more humane than any in the world." She maintained, "Henry Plantagenet's ferocious blue eyes saw further into the future than any other man's."

The...

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