Reader reviews and comments on Fury, plus links to write your own review.

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Fury by Salman Rushdie X
Fury by Salman Rushdie
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  • First Published:
    Sep 2001, 272 pages
    Paperback:
    Aug 2002, 272 pages

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punyajit gupta

Fury
Malik Solanka in Fury has been projected by Rushdie as an Odyssey of individual's conflict against ever imposing power of society to categorize any thing on the basis of difference. Solanka through out the novel has been portrayed as a collector and curator of odd experiences in society which he tried to project through his wordl of Dolls.
punyajitgupta

Fury - an escape or an introspection
In Fury, Salman Rushdie has tried to come to term with the Tsunami of Globalization gobbling local sentiments and even their distinct identities. Novel "eat me" concept has been harbored from Malik Solanka's consistent struggle to maintain his creative identity against the dominant influences of his relatives and society.His projection of baby doll Little Britain is an example of his creative identity which is modeled by society to emerge as another Frankenstein. This prompt him to lose his identity in multicultural city of New World.
Power Reviewer
cloggie downunder

not my favourite Rushdie
Fury is Salman Rushdie’s 8th novel. Professor Malik Solanka, historian and doll-maker, is living in New York, alone, voluntarily celibate, angry and afraid. He has left behind in England, Eleanor, his wife of fifteen years and his beloved young son Asmaan. He fled when he found himself standing over their sleeping forms with a knife. There’s a fury in him and he fears he’s become dangerous to those he loves. He’s the creator of a doll, Little Brain, of which, when it became a phenomenon, he lost control: it now stands for everything he despises. We follow Solanka’s tale as he tries to overcome his fury by losing himself in America at a time of unprecedented plenty. We learn some of his own backstory and watch his encounters with a young woman in a baseball cap, his acquaintances in New York and then a woman with whom he falls in love. This novel contains some self-deprecating seemingly semi-autobiographical snippets of Rushdie. There is some lovely prose worthy of this author, but much of the novel is Malik’s stream of consciousness which is sometimes amusing or interesting, but is sometimes rather tedious. I enjoyed the backstory of the Puppet Kings and the way it blended into the real world. Not Rushdie’s best work and certainly not my favourite.
Anonymous

At 55, the Indian born, NY dwelling protagonist of Rushdie's latest novel Fury, has the kind of rage which causes him to stand with a knife over the sleeping bodies of his wife and son, scream in public, and slip between the red heat of anger to blackouts which leave him questioning his sanity and public safety. His anger is also part of the broader anger of the world - the human condition, which prefigures recent terrorist attacks, and hints at the kind of anger which makes anything possible. Click here for my full detailed review of Salman Rushdie's latest novel, Fury: The Upper West Side of the Malevolent Divine: Salman Rushdie’s Fury
Vincenzo Misseneo (Adelaide)

This book is boring, unfunny and waste of time!!!!! :(
Vidsub

I'm a 20 year old and have waited very long to read this book. It is a book written in typical Rushdie style going from exceptional in places to totally bizzare in others. The central character Malik "Solly" Solanka is a 55 year old indian who finds himself helpless at the hands of an uncontrollable fury that arises within him from time to time. His sudden journey to NewYork is an attempt to rid himself of this fury and it leads him through a maze of various other fuies - "sexual,Oedipal,political,magical,brutal" which drives him to his"finest heights and coasest depths". It is a good book and gives a reader a lot to think about questioning the very paradigms that drive this world we live in today.
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