Reader reviews and comments on Dune: House Atreides, plus links to write your own review.

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Dune: House Atreides

by Brian Herbert, Kevin J. Anderson

Dune: House Atreides by Brian Herbert, Kevin J. Anderson X
Dune: House Atreides by Brian Herbert, Kevin J. Anderson
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  • First Published:
    Oct 1999, 604 pages
    Aug 2000, 720 pages

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There are currently 10 reader reviews for Dune: House Atreides
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Frédéric Plante (12/11/17)

There is a diffence between facts and Legends
I've been reading lots of reviews here.

Some seem to miss the fact that there is a big difference between the legend being told in one book, and the real story that happen for real.

You must understand that the Saga developed on a 200 century time base. And just like in reality, story tend to change over time, specially if it is being pass orally, like in Dune.

What you take for mistakes are in fact voluntarily put there to make it more realistic.
Matthew White (08/11/10)

Was a fan.
I really liked this book a whole lot, until I dusted off my edition of the original "Dune" and started reading. I read reviews of the house books online decrying plot holes and what not, but I didn't really take them seriously because any sort of book as monumental as Dune will always have a rabid near insane fan base that demand perfection from any sort of new material in what they view as "their universe". After re-reading the original dune novel, I found the dissidents to be right. I spotted plot holes immediately. I don't want to spoil anything, but though the plot holes might be small, they are very numerous. I find this a little discouraging, I guess because of the connections of the two main authors of the universe of Dune are that of father and son, and I feel the son might have take the source material a little closer to heart. The new dune books (especially House Atreides) are a fun fast paced read, but they stray to much from the source material to really give believable answers to the questions posed in the original books.
Nathan Kuczmarski (01/09/09)

Dune: House Atreides
Dune: Kouse Atreides is truly a great read. Its perfect for anyone who loves to read sci-fi books. Also remember there are other Dune books in the series.
nick (08/04/05)

New Dune series.
Overall, the entire series is poorly done. It is nearly impossible to imagine that the motivations and personalities introduced in this prequel series lead to those actually depicted in the real Dune series of books.

There are huge mistakes and a large amount of what goes on is truly irreconcileable with the other Dune books.

Overall, worth it only for the shock factor of seeing a beautiful jewel smashed to pieces.

drama_queen (12/11/04)

I loved this book, I found answers that I had been pestering people about. Now things are begining to make sense (wink), I guess I just like lotsa clear explination. Anyway if anybody liked the origionals then they should deffinitly read this.
mapes (11/12/04)

Could have been a dud but has been very skilfully handled. The book is written in a clean style - I think the writing is better than Herbert's, though it doesn't generate quite the same atmosphere. Overall you would have to say it is a good read and any fan of the originals will derive a lot of pleasure from reading it.
Jason (04/15/04)

I have not yet to read this book. I love reading Frank Herbert books of Dune. I will buy and yet it so exciting. The Elements of this book is almost like real to me as I imagined it.
rdemarco (01/03/03)

It is a good book for spending time without further worring. It has lots of action, an intersting plot. It lacks the mythic appeal of the original dune series but provide us a intersting overview of the pre dune world.
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