Reader reviews and comments on The Children's Blizzard, plus links to write your own review.

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reading Guide |  Reviews |  Beyond the book |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

The Children's Blizzard

by David Laskin

The Children's Blizzard by David Laskin
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    Nov 2004, 320 pages
    Paperback:
    Oct 2005, 336 pages

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
BookBrowse Review Team

Buy This Book

About this Book

Reviews

Page 1 of 2
There are currently 11 reader reviews for The Children's Blizzard
Order Reviews by:

Write your own review!

Esther W.

Gripping, haunting and heartbreaking
I happened upon this book while browsing, and am really glad I decided to buy it. It's one of the best books I've ever read. The story of these families, children and adults is heartbreaking, the medical information is fascinating, and the detailed weather info very educational. I've read parts of it over and over Laskin's eloquence is simply stunning. Whenever it snows or is very cold, I can't help but think about this haunting account, and I'm grateful again for my healthy children and my warm house.
Catherine G. Lind

Children's Blizzard story
After reading the book, which I did almost non stop, it was so sad and bittersweet and a real look into our history. You could see the storm in your minds eye progressing, I learned more about how weather works in the best possible way. I will not only suggest this book to others I will buy it for them. Growing up in Minnesota I remember the names and places he talks about it explained things I just skipped through but remembered as I read the story. This took a lot of work to write and a lot of research, it shows. Kudos to Mr. Laskin.
Beverly

Heartbreaking
This was one of the best books I have read. A heartbreaking story of history told. I grew up in Iowa & could relate to the harsh winters in the plains. Very captivating book. A must read for people who live there.
Scott

I found "Children's Blizzard" quite enjoyable, approaching gripping. Read it in two days.
Anonymous

Good human interest, revisionist history
This book is a really good read, and the human interest parts of it are exceptional. However, I take exception to the revisionist tone of the book. The author is judging the decisions of people in 1874-1888 based on modern ideas and technology. It really doesn't matter a hill of beans if the signal corps failed to get their warning flags up in time. The only people who would have known would have been those who lived within sight of the flags. There were no TVs, radios, telephones or even cars with which to spread that word. What does he expect would have happened, some Paul Revere would have gotten on his horse and galloped sixty or eighty miles shouting :"the blizzard is coming, the blizzard is coming" in subzero temperatures? That would have been madness. No horse could travel far enough and fast enough to warn anyone and the outcome would have been substantially the same, except for the additional fatality of the horse and rider. I also take exception with the idea the author seems to be presenting, that the immigrants would have been better off had they not been lured to the prairies by false advertising. Had the Ukrainian Mennonites not migrated to the plains, they likely would have died at the hands of Stalin within 45 years, with no survivors. Yes, life on the plains was tough. Yes, the immigrants lost children. But life was tough all over in the late 19th and early 20th century. There was no safe place for children in that period. None. Revising or judging history is always a dangerous idea. Revising and assigning blame without taking all the facts of history into account is just plain silly.
Paula

he Children's Blizzard
The event behind the book is fascinating. To try to comprehend the destruction that this storm left behind is almost unbearable. The book is interesting. The style of writing is at times disjointed. I found myself tempted to skip the page after page of meteorological information. I wanted more of the story of the people in the blizzard.
Phyllis Sandoval

A Compelling Read
One of those books you don't put down once you start, Children's Blizzard captured me right away. Larkin draws you into the lives of the people forever changed in January 1888. His written account of the weather dynamics was fascinating, his view on the politics were perceptive. Compare the aftermath of this historic blizzard with the aftermath of Katrina to see how our culture has changed.
dee hardy

average book. While the topic is gripping the book is dijointed.
  • Page
  • 1
  • 2

Support BookBrowse

Become a Member and discover books that entertain, engage & enlighten!

Join Today!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: Before We Sleep
    Before We Sleep
    by Jeffrey Lent
    Katey Snow, aged seventeen, leaves home one night. "There was a void within her and one that could ...
  • Book Jacket
    The Hermit
    by Thomas Rydahl
    If you can be comfortable with Scandinavian noir played out against the sun-drenched backdrop of ...
  • Book Jacket: The Radium Girls
    The Radium Girls
    by Kate Moore
    In 1915, Austrian-born Sabin von Sochocky developed a luminescent paint that used radium to create a...

Win this book!
Win News of the World

News of the World

A brilliant work of historical fiction that explores the boundaries of family, responsibility, honor, and trust.

Enter

First Impressions

  • Book Jacket

    The Gypsy Moth Summer
    by Julia Fierro

    One of the most anticipated books of 2017.
    Reader Reviews

Word Play

Solve this clue:

T's S I Numbers

and be entered to win..

Book Discussion
Book Jacket
The One-in-a-Million Boy by Monica Wood

A richly layered novel of hearts broken seemingly beyond repair and then bound by a stunning act of human devotion.

About the book
Join the discussion!

Books that     
entertain,
     engage

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends books that we believe to be best in class. Books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, that will expand your mind and challenge you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.