Reader reviews and comments on Trojan Odyssey, plus links to write your own review.

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Trojan Odyssey

by Clive Cussler

Trojan Odyssey by Clive Cussler X
Trojan Odyssey by Clive Cussler
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  • First Published:
    Nov 2003, 496 pages
    Dec 2004, 480 pages

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There are currently 5 reader reviews for Trojan Odyssey
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All I have to say is wow, ok thats not all, but this book was awesome but after a while why wouldn't it be its Cussler And I also reccomend the Seahunters
Pat Delaney

Cussler is so clever, he gets us to believe the impossible. I always enjoy his different slants on history. Dirk Pitt is getting older but he sure hasn't slowed down. He now has 2 offspring to help out. So there are some surprises in this fast moving novel for us Cussler fans. This book is definitely a winner after Cusslers last few 'also rans'.

A build-up of the Odyssey myth that ends up nowhere. Implausible technological premise. Sensationalism seemingly contrived to cash in on prospective movie rights but doesn't work towards achieving a decent read.
Alan Braggins

For me there were two major flaws in this book for me, but it's hard to say much about them without spoiling the plot. The first is the relationship between the opponent mentioned in the cover blurb and the unusual behaviour of the storm (also mentioned in the cover blurb). The second is some technology important to the plot, that simply could not possibly work as described in a way that should have been obvious to an agency like NUMA. I'm not talking about the sort of implausibility that comes with the genre (the overall plot, and the actual "Trojan" stuff (though living near some of the relevent locations does rather point out the silliness of that) are fine in that context), but the device in question is up there with faster than light starships for physical reality, and no-one even comments on it.

Bad writing and editing, with some misogyny thrown in. Cussler should be ashamed.
I first read a Clive Cussler novel about 18 years ago. I took it for what it was, a fun and fast-paced action movie in the form of a book. I suspended my belief long enough to enjoy a bit of a daring hero romp, and that was fine. I looked to this book for more of the same and could not have been more disappointed.

Whoever edited this book needs reprimanded, or even fired. Some of the setting description repetition was jarring and the misuse of phrases and continuity errors were quite bad as well.

The outright misogyny was DEPLORABLE. I could let it slide that the bad guys were all girls and they were all smokin' hot. I forgave him for making Summer (the action hero's daughter) helpless and a damsel. I even let it go when the hard-core soldier guy makes some comment about how his hard-core shootykillers might need counselling after killing civilian women because they were “knockouts”.

But the comment about the German Scientist, held captive with her husband, was unforgivable. Call her matronly, grandmotherly or even say she's well-fed (though that's still rude) but for Dirk Pitt, hero extraordinaire, to look at this woman and comment to himself that she'll never fit a size sixteen dress is so incredibly sexist and rude it makes me sick. When I read that bit I wanted to throw the book from me as hard as possible, preferably at Cussler's face.

The comment, like most of the drivel that filled this novel, had absolutely NOTHING to do with the story, plot, situation or ANYTHING relevant. This novel is filled with those. While everybody gets introduced and described in detail, from an old car to a helicopter pilot, none of it ever has anything to do with the damn story.

Speaking of which, if Dirk Pitt can land in a helicopter after evading machine-gunning bad guys, hear a pilot (living in Nicaragua for years) say two things and identify the accent as Montanan only to have it be from neighbouring Wyoming, then I'll stand in front of Cussler and eat my goddam hat. What a bag of sh*t.

Same on you Cussler. This novel had promise, but you made the entire thing a bag of sh*t.
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