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The Man From Saigon

A Novel

by Marti Leimbach

The Man From Saigon by Marti Leimbach
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  • Published in USA  Feb 2010
    352 pages
    Genre: Novels

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There are currently 20 reader reviews for The Man From Saigon
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Power Reviewer mainlinebooker

The exclamation that says it all!
Riveting and vivid are two words that come to my mind. The visual imagery that exploded in my mind from reading this made me hungry for every word. She painted a detailed landscape so lush and dense making me feel I was thrust alive inside this horrific world.
Hydee F. (Salt Lake City, Utah)

Unexpectedly riveting
I wasn't sure I was going to enjoy this book based upon the setting, the Vietnam War isn't exactly my favorite setting for historical fiction, but I found myself unable to put his book down once I got into it. The subplots are interesting, and valuable, and I really came to care about Susan and Son. In the end, I found myself deeply saddened it was over, and wanted more!
Katherine W. (El Sobrante, CA)

Jungle Love
Although I was slow to warm up to "The Man From Saigon", by the time I was well into the narrative, the book was almost impossible to put down. Marti Lembach's writing was so evocative of the suffocating heat found in the Viet Nam jungle that I found myself breaking out into a sweat and getting concerned that I might come down with foot rot This novel is an artful tapestry in which a love story, espionage and historical and political fiction are woven together seamlessly.
Linda C. (Carlisle, MA)

The Man From Saigon
From the very first paragraph I was harshly pulled into the world of the Vietnam war. With an incredible ability to enable the reader the experience every setting to the fullest, Marti Leimbach bombarded all of my senses. Because of these details, I was masterfully drawn into every experience in this surrealistic setting of war. It was a story of relationships and humanity fitting into a war zone. Relationships were filled with mystery and intrigue that come and go within the constant that is war. It is a war novel that a woman can experience in a way most don't achieve. An excellent read that keeps the reader riveted!
Lorraine R. (Southampton, New York)

The Man From Saigon
It is unusual to read a war novel about a female reporter. The author successfully relates a very difficult and sad time in American history through the perspective of a female. Many books have been written about this period through the eyes of the soldiers, such as the Things they Carried by Tim O'Brien, and this is a refreshing change from the war novel genre. This is well-written and thoughtful literature. It would be good book club novel to be read in conjunction with other Vietnam war novels.
Barbara B. (New Bern, NC)

I loved this book.
I loved “The Man from Saigon” by Marti Leimbach.
I would highly recommend reading this book. I enjoyed reading the story because it was about the Vietnam War which I know very little about.
The story is about a gutsy, quirky female correspondent in Vietnam who was not afraid to go the front line. It is also a love story and the many effects the war has on everyone involved.
The main characters are Susan Gifford one of the first few woman correspondents in Vietnam in 1967. Marc Davis, Susan’s lover, a TV reporter, married, and has been in Vietnam too long. Our third colorful and mysterious character and part of the love triangle is Son, who is a Vietnamese photographer who became Susan’s partner, companion, interpreter and as the story goes, her protector.
When Susan and Son are captured by three young Viet Cong, we see how courageous Susan is, how mysterious Son is and how the hardship of war and his love for Susan have affected Marc.
Lorraine R. (Southampton, New York)

The Man From Saigon
It is unusual to read a war novel about a female reporter. The author successfully relates a very difficult and sad time in American history through the perspective of a female. Many books have been written about this period through the eyes of the soldiers, such as the Things they Carried by Phil Caputo, and this is a refreshing change from the war novel genre. This is well-written and thoughtful literature. It would be good book club novel to be read in conjunction with other Vietnam war novels.
Carol W. (Henrico, NC)

Leimbach's books
Leimbach's novel "Daniel isn't talking" proved to be a personal work of fiction. You were drawn in to the characters.
She tries to do the same thing in "The man from Saigon." Every good novelists makes you want to be the protagonist or have a great sympathy for one of the characters.
The Vietnam War is very foreign to me. I'm not of the right generation. The only people that talk about the war were people on the fringes of it. Their impressions are light hearted and one knows that wasn't the situation.
This novel educates. I don't know if her assumptions are correct, but they are griping. The world of war--smells, hardships, fear--all make a book that is hard to put down.
Thank you for sending the book. I would not have read it without this incentive.
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