Reader reviews and comments on True At First Light, plus links to write your own review.

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True At First Light

by Ernest Hemingway

True At First Light by Ernest Hemingway
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  • First Published:
    Jul 1999, 320 pages
    Paperback:
    Jul 2000, 320 pages

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There are currently 4 reader reviews for True At First Light
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mischelle (08/16/04)

it is slow moving boring and not my style
bwanamitch (05/20/04)

I am nearing 61. I belive that Papa was about 62 when he ate the lead.

Now treatable, then ignored, alcohol got Popa. Bwana Mouse, his son, Patrick, did a great job in licking his father's papers into a well connected book. (Read into. carefully.) Reviewers who think that the book is disjointed, missed the point. Papa did marry Deba, the consumation of this marrage is documented, "carried on in front of Mary...."

The Anchent Hunter Religion has lots to offer. The problem is with the Muhammadian's hard line monothiesm. Watch the Iraq war for details. Had Papa's alchohol addiction been diagnosed and treated with as simple a perscription as AA, he might have lived long enough to explain the bielief in Gitchie Manitou to the Arab world's satisfaction, and redirected the Southern Babtists, (read Texas borna agains,) onto onto the right track. Peace, or a quick painless death, rest well Papa, I got the message.
Martinez Santiago (09/19/02)

True at First Light is a novel written from edited manuscript by not even Ernest Hemingway, but his own son Patrick and arguably whether this is its fault, the book remains unconnected, pointless and unfinished. To say it is a good read is a joke when pages of descriptive material is dedicated to explaining how Mary is short and shot a wildebeest 14 inches lower than her aim, and how Hemingway is fascinated with a local Kenyan woman named Debba who is in line to be wife number five. It is at points you consider Hemingway's want to remain a Westerner or if he wants to become an African where for some cultures, polygyny is accepted. Apart from the odd drink with Gin Crazed or shopping trip in the local village, the story is pretty much boring and not a good read at all. True, this is a posthumous novel and is not like The Sun also Rises or A Farewell to arms which are not posthumous, but it is pretty much a novel with an estimated manuscript value that doesn't live up to it's author. For someone who finds this book the best they have read should find more to read. Hemingway was a celebrated writer and could be considered inspirational to many, but

<< [Hemingway] taught us how to take on our individual worlds unafraid boldly walking into our own destinies >>

is a bit rich.
Vivienne Seaman (08/21/02)

I had not read any Hemingway since High School. Shame on me.

I did not want this book to end. I love it, haven't read anything better in years.

Hemingway loved life, his wife Mary, and Africa. He was honest to a fault, unafraid to divulge his true feelings and shortcomings. The dialogue between he and Mary is so easy, so intimate, and poignant.
Mary speaks of his infidelity almost as matter of fact, did she resent his behavior? Was it alright he loved the young African Debba? Just as long as he loved her (Mary) more!

Hemingway took the whole of Africa and embraced, land, culture, harsh conditions, all of it just to be there. He understood his fellow man and women , he learned and gleaned all that there was from his surroundings. His mind was in high gear ready to absorb every detail of life and put it to use. He studied human behavior and accepted it.

Hemingway was an author of unmatched skill in storytelling and revealing himself. He had a most interesting life, learned much, traveled, and taught. He taught us how to take on our individual worlds unafraid boldly walking into our own destinies. He was brave, and a master of storytelling, details and the English language. This book deserves a perfect 10!

I had to buy it after reading it, just to have it in my home.


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