Reader reviews and comments on The Shadow King, plus links to write your own review.

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The Shadow King

A Novel

by Maaza Mengiste

The Shadow King by Maaza Mengiste X
The Shadow King by Maaza Mengiste
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    Sep 2020, 448 pages
    Paperback:
    Oct 2020, 448 pages

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Book Reviewed by:
Elisabeth Cook
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Reviews

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There are currently 25 reader reviews for The Shadow King
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Carlos Cesar Lapiz/Bahrc

None
Highly recommend this profound reading. Page after page captivated by brilliant prose. I am a Vietnam Veteran and fully understand the heroic value of women in combat. Never underestimate a determined woman to fight for the freedom of her native country. I am old enough to remember the glorious victory of Ethiopia as a very young child and a passion for literature. This novel is a work of art at its finest. I paint the best way I can, but not as I would like. Ms. Mengiste keep the beauty of literature alive. Thank you for this remarkable gift. By the way today is my birthday. What a final gift.
Peggy A.

Me and my Shadow
I found this book to be very intense, absorbing, and provocative in its subject matter. I was definitely transported to another time, pre WW2, and a wholly different culture. While it took the author, Maaza Mengiste, a lot of time to set up the plot, the book gained much needed momentum after the first 100 or so pages. I’m glad I was patient as the author was brilliant in her depiction of the major characters. All 5 of the characters had many levels of introspection and complexity....shape shifting in terms of their moral goodness and its opposite. There was a mashup of unexpected relationships between them that kept me as a reader somewhat unbalanced but definitely involved. Each character had a light and shadow side as the narrative evolved. Her writing was brilliant! I highly recommend this book if you enjoy historical and provocative books.
Power Reviewer
Beverly J. (Hoover, AL)

A Gem of a Story
The Shadow King is a richly textured and carefully constructed compelling must-needed work of historical fiction. As Fascist Italy invades Ethiopia in 1935, the men prepare to defend their country, but the women of Ethiopia will not be denied to preserve their country. Mengiste wrote this storyline to honor the women of Ethiopia who fought along side the men and are too often ignored in the history of wartime.

Pairing expressive language with well-drawn unforgettable characters the story grips the reader as we become involved in the intimate harrowing details of the characters against the broader background that is the history and politics of the time.

A richly rewarding reading experience this memorable work of historical fiction that provides a much needed Ethiopian point-of-view on one of the beginning points of WWII and equally needed what it means to be a woman at war.
Susan U. (Brookfield, WI)

Strong women lead
This book reflects the brutality of war, you feel it but the language is so beautiful you can get through the brutality. The women in the book are strong and you feel their fierceness as they fight for the common cause of saving their country, their world. I'm a historic fiction addict and am always satisfied when I come away having read something that teaches me an important part of history. It takes time to read because you need to absorb it, not rush through it. Recommend it to your strong women friends. They will thank you.
Joy E. (Rockville, MD)

Mythic Tale of a Forgotten War
The Shadow King is a beautifully written story of the war fought by the Ethiopians against the invading Italians in 1935. Mostly known by Westerners for the unsuccessful plea for help by Ethiopia's leader Haile Selasse to the League of Nations, this war was a lopsided and heart-breaking struggle in pastoral corner of Africa.

Kidane is a local leader who gathers a ragtag army to fight against the ferenji or foreigners seeking to conquer their land. Hirut is a young, courageous servant in Kidane's household in the rural countryside. Slowly, inexorably, Hirut and Kidane's wife Aster take larger roles in the guerrilla warfare. Their inevitable failure unrolls slowly in poetic language that has the reader wishing for a different ending.

The heroism of strong and proud men and women is wonder to read.
Borderlass, Belmont, MA

An Exciting Addition to Feminist and African Literature
This novel is defined by the sheer emotionality of the reading experience depicting Ethiopia's pursuit of independence from fascist Italian occupation. As one turns each page, one discovers yet another facet of war and how one terror passes only to yield to another of greater degree. The intensity of feelings these scenes promote are not intended to comfort the reader - rather to immerse one in some of one's worst nightmares - a disquieting experience beyond the capacities of sensitive readers. The author's clever use of dualities in style (e.g., lyrical prose describing violence) and in substance (class, gender, economics, and qualities of leadership - or its absence) are among its other hallmarks.

This book would appeal to any reader of classic feminist or African literature and should be required reading for any government major or careerist needing a foundation in the roots of conflict. This brilliantly constructed novel, timewise, serves as a pre-quel to Mengiste's prior novel, "Beneath the Lion's Gaze," which captured the ensuing years of constant instability and combat in Ethiopia from a mostly male perspective. This - her latest - "The Shadow King" will be studied by and for women in war zones for its uniquely feminist discourse.
Power Reviewer
Rebecca R. (Western USA)

A Stunning Epic Tale
Although there have been many books written about or set in the time frame of World War Two, Maaza Mengiste's epic story is unique. There's no one book to which THE SHADOW KING can be compared; this is a 'Hotel Rwanda,' 'Gone With the Wind,' and "All Quiet on the Western Front,' rolled into one but set in Ethiopia and told with an emphasis on the female perspective of Hirut, an African enslaved to other Africans. Woven into this story is also the history of Emperor Haile Selassie who has loved his position of wealth and power and can not come to grips with the disintegration of his position.
There are so many powerful sentences that make a reader stop and think about the truth contained in the words that you will never finish the book if you stop to log them all. Another strength of this book is its unflinching honesty about the ravages of war, from the rape of women to the important part that female fighters played in Ethiopia as Mussolini stepped up his quest for world power and personal glory at any cost, to the insensitivity of some wartime photographers, along with the horror of brave warriors fighting with spears against tanks and planes with mustard gas. At 419 pages (in my ARC) and a smaller font than many books these days, this is not a book for the faint of heart, but it deserves to be read!
Nicole S. (St. Paul, MN)

Gripping!
Maaza Mengiste had me hooked with the first page. What an incredible story. I found myself googling the historical pieces of the book to see if they were true and I was enthralled by the unraveling of this historical fiction. Mengiste Ms writing makes the foreign seem universal and the universal seem intimately unique. I can't wait to read her other works!

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