What readers think of The Swallows of Kabul, plus links to write your own review.

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The Swallows of Kabul

by Yasmina Khadra

The Swallows of Kabul by Yasmina Khadra X
The Swallows of Kabul by Yasmina Khadra
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  • First Published:
    Feb 2004, 208 pages

    Paperback:
    Apr 2005, 208 pages

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There are currently 6 reader reviews for The Swallows of Kabul
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LexI

Best Book Ever
The Swallows of Kabul is the best book I have ever read. I would recommend it to anyone who is looking for a heart softening book. Thanks to my social studies class I am glad I read this.
Tommy

khadra's club
With "Swallows of Kabul" I was blown away with Khadra's poetic laments about the devoidness of life in Taliban dominated Afghanistan. I also recently read the second in his trilogy, "Attack," which tells the story of a financially successful Palestinian doctor residing in Israel, who comes to realize after a great deal of self denial and inner torment, that his wife had been enlisted as a terrorist bomber. Khadra's latest book. "Sirens of Baghdad" has just been released in French.
Babulal

Goooood Job!
Shahram A.

I think this book was very interesting.
Jorge

This book has touched my soul. It is written with such humanity, it is so poetic that one wants to read the pages over and over again. It is powerful and full of romanticism. I can't wait to read Mr. Khadra's other books.
Barbara

I read this book on recomendation of a friend and truly enjoyed it. The author helped me to see the terrible life changes that occured to the people of Kabul under Taliban rule. How women lost their identity and lived a "faceless" life under their burqas. How the men would be seen in the streets of Kabul wearing their turbans and carrying a whip. How all lived in fear of any retribution from the Taliban.
The author( who interestingly enough, took on a female pseudonym because he was in the military) delved into the lives of two families. How they meet is such a good story! What happened to Atiq the jailer and the circumstances that occured when he met Zamaira was shocking but also very sad. A powerful book that allowed me to glimpse into the lives of these people who have endoured so much.
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