Reader reviews and comments on Love, plus links to write your own review.

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Love by Toni Morrison
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  • First Published:
    Oct 2003, 208 pages
    Paperback:
    Jan 2005, 208 pages

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There are currently 5 reader reviews for Love
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Mei (10/13/07)

Classic Toni
As with Paradise , Beloved and The Bluest Eyes, Love makes you start all over again reading. It's like, How did I miss that? Why didn't I see that ? Toni takes you to another level with each novel. I anxiously await the next.
EZ (01/30/05)

It was an excellent book, took me on a deep exploration of the human psyche. Having read 90% of Morrison's work, I was delighted to find that Love follows in the footsteps of her previous writing. The language is amazing, convoluted with hints and glimpses of truths and metaphors that need to be re-read in order to be absorbed. Some passages simply jump at you, and sometimes it takes a while to recover. Morison also re-writes the old history of gender and race, once again, in her own creative and inspiring way. I couldn't put the book down, and it made me love its author even more.
vtq (12/05/04)

i must have read a different novel. the one before me is the devil's menu. it's boring, cliched, and so repetitive, it's predictable. toni morrison writes from a template: slavery, women, and the so called 'strong man' that women fascinate over. it's all been done. it's amazing that such literary work is institutionalised. wanna a good read, try James Joyve...form and content at its level best.
vtq
K.V.RAJU, SBI, ZO, TRIVANDRUM (01/26/04)


All her writings are of love in its varied versions. It is all about love lost and love regained. It assumed a socialistic elevation in her Paradise - true to her view that black literature is not for substituting the totalizing tendencies of the existing white literature. In love she condescend to the ground realities of love. The focus as in the case of Paradise is on her own community. As creator of a dominating black literature she has every right to criticise her community using the same vehicle of literature.
Anonymous (11/07/03)

I would like to say that Toni Morrison has outdone herself this time with Love, but that would be a lie! For every book that I have read of hers, I have come away in deep thought, often finding some aspect of her stories that mirror my life or those around me. What I liked best about Love and all of her books is that she forces the reader to pay attention to every small detail because that detail will be required for understanding something else later. Love took me on an emotional journey as I read and fought with my own memories of love, hate, envy, jealousy, sadness and disappointment. The characters were so true to life, they were frightening at times. And sadly, the power that May, Christine, Heed, Junior, Vida and L relinquished to have a relationship with Bill Cosey was absolutely devastating in its own right. And the fact that this kind of behavior is never talked about or tolerated in real life amongst women only made reading about it so much more tragic. However, I felt safe reading it because who in their right mind would openly admit that some man violated them by accepting love (loosely used here), rather than taking it? It wouldn’t be a violation, now would it? No, Ms. Morrison has not outdone herself this time with Love, she has simply and in a new way re-adjusted its meaning.

--Mrs. Ty Kelley-Lamb, 36
Philadelphia, PA
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