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What readers think of Reading Lolita In Tehran, plus links to write your own review.

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Reading Lolita In Tehran

by Azar Nafisi

Reading Lolita In Tehran by Azar Nafisi X
Reading Lolita In Tehran by Azar Nafisi
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  • First Published:
    Mar 2003, 368 pages

    Paperback:
    Dec 2003, 384 pages

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There are currently 14 reader reviews for Reading Lolita In Tehran
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ern

I was extremely surprised when I read of even ONE person who was disappointed with this book (although if someone didn't understand the basis of this novel, I can see how they would be confused). The author's poignant prose actually reads like poetry and is a beautiful illustration of the ravages of war on the human soul. I enjoyed how each experience was tied to the reading of various English authors and how these novels were defined by those steeped in Eastern thought. I most certainly cannot wait to read another of her books and would recommend it to anyone else who loves these types of "cultural" works.
Donna Fricke

For the past 2 years, friends kept asking if I'd read Reading Lolita in TehranText, and I kept answering that it was in my stack. Well, I've finally gotten to it and what a treasure it is. Not only does it give what seems to me (I've never been to Iran) a brilliant and loving insight into Iran, but it also gives a brilliant insight into the soul of a teacher, scholar, mentor, friend. Nafisi is an excellent writer, and the structure of the book, a memoir in books, is inspired. I can hardly wait for her next book, and now I too will begin bantering friends with the question "Have you read Reading Lolita in Tehran yet?"Text
Mahsa

A great connecting book to my soul and my experiences. It pictures the values of Iranian people desires apart from what the regime make them to do.
A picture of the young people craving to discover more and more about lide even in the repression situation around. It is a masterpiece that made me cry
as a persian girl to remember all these ugly realities that was and are happening to people in Iran, but still morals and curiosity blossom and never die...
gallahawk

This was a powerful book evoking strong feelings; I was actually angry with the Iranian religious regime as I read it. The author did a great job of comparing the lives of herself and her students in their own political situation with the similarities of the characters of great Western literature banned in Iran. She forces readers to comtemplate their own feelings and actions if presented with a similar political/religious environment. Her command of English is wonderful - poetic and flowing - even though she is not a native speaker. This is one I will read again.
april thomas

Reading this book gave me insight in understanding in a culture vastly different from my own. By the end of the book I appreciated the many freedmans that we have in this country. To be able to move about freely and to read and discuss a book without fear is a great thing.
Daniel

Sure Dry, But Great For Understading
Although I must admit that this book is rather dry and I missed some journal deadlines for my High School class by nearly a week, it is a great book for gaining valuable insight into the tyranny the people of Iran have had to live through, and delivers a unique story on how the author coped with it by living in her imagination and books. Would not recommend to most people, but this is a book that was worth forcing myself to read to the end.
Bibliophiend

This author's ability to analyse Western literature and explain its subtleties gives the reader new appreciation for it. When you stop to consider that the author and her book group put their lives at risk to read these works, it also makes you appreciate how unfortunate it is that the majority of Americans will ignore these books or read them grudgingly for school credit. Her stories range from the humorous to the appalling and each is told in such a way to make the reader better understand the lives of the politically repressed. One need not have a thorough knowledge of Iranian history nor the books discussed to greatly enjoy this writer's story. Perhaps it will help us to appreciate our freedoms and not take them so for granted. I have read this book three times now; once when it first was released, again for a non-fiction book group, and finally when it was chosen as our town's "One Book" and each time I have drawn new things from it...a sign of a classic in my estimation.
Catherine

We read this for book club. It was like taking a literature course! She does a great job of discussing the book and tying it into the politics her country. The middle was a bit slow. Made us all want to read or reread the classics.
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