MLA Platinum Award Press Release

BookBrowse Reviews Dairy Queen by Catherine Gilbert Murdock

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reviews |  Beyond the book |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

Dairy Queen by Catherine Gilbert Murdock X
Dairy Queen by Catherine Gilbert Murdock
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    May 2006, 278 pages
    Paperback:
    Jun 2007, 278 pages

    Genres

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
BookBrowse Review Team
Buy This Book

About this Book

Reviews

BookBrowse:


A painfully funny novel....a fresh teen voice, great football action and cows - this novel rocks.

From the book jacket: "When you don't talk, there’s a lot of stuff that ends up not getting said."  Harsh words indeed, from Brian Nelson of all people. But, D. J. can't help admitting, maybe he’s right.  Stuff like why her best friend, Amber, isn’t so friendly anymore. Or why her little brother, Curtis, never opens his mouth. Why her mom has two jobs and a big secret. Why her college-football-star brothers won't even call home. Why her dad would go ballistic if she tried out for the high school football team herself. And why Brian is so, so out of her league.  Welcome to the summer that fifteen-year-old D. J. Schwenk of Red Bend, Wisconsin, learns to talk, and ends up having an awful lot of stuff to say.

Comment: If we had a category for great books that almost got away, Dairy Queen would be on it.  Published in hardcover in May 2006, it sat on the shelf above my desk for a couple of months, bringing a smile to my face every time I looked at the cow on the cover (sadly, there is no quizzical cow on the paperback jacket, instead the publisher has chosen an image of two teens, which is likely to be of more appeal to the intended target audience, but not to their mothers!) Eventually, I started to read Dairy Queen to our two children at our "morning reading parties" (the magical half-hour we take out at the start of each school day when they climb into our bed to be read to).

We got a couple of chapters in before they decided that the storyline was a little too "teenage" for them (they were 11 and 13 at the time), so Dairy Queen got set aside again;  the only difference being that this time the cow was  staring at me in the morning when I woke! Finally, I found a couple of quiet hours to finish the story myself,  and what a delight it is.  D.J. is a heroine to root for - funny, intelligent, independent and self-deprecating.  I thoroughly recommend Dairy Queen (the first of a planned trilogy) to teenage girls - and if the occasional boy could bring himself to read it, he might not only enjoy it but would glean more about the female psyche than he'll learn from any number of locker room discussions!

This review was originally published in The BookBrowse Review in October 2006, and has been updated for the June 2007 edition. Click here to go to this issue.

This review is available to non-members for a limited time. For full access become a member today.
Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" articles
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $39 for a year or $12 for 3 months
  • More about membership!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: When We Were Vikings
    When We Were Vikings
    by Andrew David MacDonald
    In When We Were Vikings by Andrew David MacDonald, readers are first introduced to Zelda on her ...
  • Book Jacket: How to Build a Heart
    How to Build a Heart
    by Maria Padian
    Maria Padian is well-known for her motif of exploring teen reactions to social issues. Her novel ...
  • Book Jacket: Follow Me to Ground
    Follow Me to Ground
    by Sue Rainsford
    Ada and her father are human-like beings who age slowly and possess the power to heal all illness. ...
  • Book Jacket: Children of the Land
    Children of the Land
    by Marcelo Hernandez Castillo
    In this exquisitely crafted memoir, Marcelo Hernandez Castillo describes coming of age as a young ...

Readers Recommend

  • Book Jacket

    The Sun Down Motel
    by Simone St. James

    The chilling new novel from the national bestselling and award-winning author of The Broken Girls.
    Reader Reviews

  • Book Jacket

    The Splendid and the Vile
    by Erik Larson

    A fresh and compelling portrait of Winston Churchill and London during the Blitz.
    Reader Reviews

Book Club Discussion
Book Jacket
American Dirt
by Jeanine Cummins

"American Dirt is a Grapes of Wrath for our times."
—Don Winslow

About the book
Join the discussion!
Win this book!
Win The Lost Family

The Lost Family
by Libby Copeland

A deeply reported look at the rise of home genetic testing and the seismic shock it has had on individual lives.

Enter

Wordplay

Solve this clue:

A F I Need I A F I

and be entered to win..

Books that     
entertain,
     engage

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends the best in contemporary fiction and nonfiction—books that not only engage and entertain but also deepen our understanding of ourselves and the world around us.