We are proud to announce that BookBrowse has won Platinum in the 2024 Modern Library Awards.

Artificial Intelligence and the Future of the Human Race: Background information when reading Day Zero

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reviews |  Beyond the Book |  Read-Alikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

Day Zero

by C. Robert Cargill

Day Zero by C. Robert Cargill X
Day Zero by C. Robert Cargill
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

     Not Yet Rated
  • First Published:
    May 2021, 304 pages

    Paperback:
    Mar 2022, 304 pages

    Genres

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
Ian Muehlenhaus
Buy This Book

About this Book

Artificial Intelligence and the Future of the Human Race

This article relates to Day Zero

Print Review

White robot looking at cameraScience fiction tends to reflect deeper moral issues and fears confronting a society at the time it is written. Storytelling is a safe method to express anxieties about the state of the world. It allows authors and readers an opportunity to explore the murkiness of uncertainty in a non-threatening manner. Reading and discussing sci-fi is a more effective outlet than, say, randomly telling neighbors you are worried their Amazon Alexa might one day turn on them. Books like Day Zero are symptomatic of contemporary angst about artificial intelligence (AI).

Today, there is increasing concern about AI threatening the future of the human race. In his later years, Stephen Hawking became a vocal critic — even as he used it himself. "The development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race," Hawking told the BBC in 2014.

Humans are limited by biological evolution, which is dreadfully slow. Soon our species won't be able to compete with AI advances. Machine learning develops at near exponential speeds, Hawking and others have argued. It will eventually — perhaps sooner than we imagine — surpass us. It's not just world-renowned astrophysicists that worry about AI; corporate leaders also recognize the potential dangers of this technology.

Elon Musk is an AI skeptic. The owner of Tesla, SpaceX and StarLink believes we are less than five years away from AI surpassing humans in certain cognitive functions. It has taken us millions of years to evolve to our current level of intelligence. He believes it will not be terribly long until the ratio of human intelligence to AI is similar to that of cats and humans today.

Musk was an early investor in one of the leading AI companies, DeepMind. He claims to have invested in this company not for a profit, but to keep abreast of the latest technological developments. He's also an active proponent of AI government oversight. He doesn't see it happening, though. Realizing corporate interests and techno-libertarians will likely oppose government intervention, Musk created a non-profit foundation, OpenAI. Its goal is to democratize AI research and facilitate scientific and government oversight of developments.

Are these skeptics overreacting? Many argue that AI is just a natural advancement of human ingenuity — a new tool in our arsenal to navigate and change the world around us. Some believe job automation may not be a bad thing. AI-powered robots may even usher in an era of universal basic income. AI development is already benefiting almost all of us living in the Global North. We take it for granted when we:

  • Communicate (social media)
  • Travel (mapping technologies)
  • Shop (online shopping and web search)
  • Bank (digital transfers and credit card fraud detection)

Steve Wozniak, Elon Musk and dozens of other prominent corporate and scientific figures have signed an open letter on the website of the Future of Life Institute affirming their opposition to autonomized AI weapons development. Letters expressing aversion are great, but it's probably too late. It is rare for any technological development to be slowed when it can be used for military purposes. A considerable amount of our modern technology, including the internet, GPS and nuclear power, is the result of military research.

News reports today still highlight the proliferation of nuclear arms and the development of hypersonic nuclear weapons by Russia. It sells — people know to be scared of nuclear weapons. It's a sideshow, though. The main event in international geopolitics right now is really the AI race between the People's Republic of China and the United States. China is now the world leader in AI development — leapfrogging past the US in total published research and AI patents.

Indubitably, the AI race is being used by both superpowers to develop weapons. The US Department of Defense has already developed an AI algorithm that beat a top-ranked, US fighter pilot in dog fight simulations — all five times they faced each other. Should the US halt development of weaponized AI? What are the implications of stopping such research if other nations – or corporations – choose to pursue it?

What of the existential fear raised in novels such as Day Zero – i.e., will AI eventually displace humanity?

At this point, it seems more likely humans will accidentally use AI to destroy ourselves. Perhaps the real threat is not AI and robots at all. It's the fact that humans continue to develop technologies to gain advantage in violent conflict, rather than to better society. Regardless of what happens, one thing is certain. Anxiety about AI's role in society is going to result in some wild fiction.

Filed under Medicine, Science and Tech

Article by Ian Muehlenhaus

This "beyond the book article" relates to Day Zero. It originally ran in May 2021 and has been updated for the March 2022 paperback edition. Go to magazine.

This review is available to non-members for a limited time. For full access become a member today.
Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" articles
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $45 for 12 months or $15 for 3 months.
  • More about membership!

Support BookBrowse

Join our inner reading circle, go ad-free and get way more!

Find out more


Top Picks

  • Book Jacket: Neighbors and Other Stories
    Neighbors and Other Stories
    by Diane Oliver
    The history of American segregation, along with changes to it in the 1960s, is sometimes taught and ...
  • Book Jacket: Wild and Distant Seas
    Wild and Distant Seas
    by Tara Karr Roberts
    Tara Karr Roberts is a newspaper columnist who also teaches English and journalism. Wild and Distant...
  • Book Jacket: The Djinn Waits a Hundred Years
    The Djinn Waits a Hundred Years
    by Shubnum Khan
    Shubnum Khan's eloquent and moving debut novel opens in 1932, when a djinn that haunts a house by ...
  • Book Jacket: Transient and Strange
    Transient and Strange
    by Nell Greenfieldboyce
    Throughout her powerful essay collection, Transient and Strange, science reporter Nell ...

BookBrowse Book Club

Book Jacket
Mockingbird Summer
by Lynda Rutledge
A powerful and emotional coming-of-age novel set in the 1960s by the bestselling author of West with Giraffes.

Members Recommend

  • Book Jacket

    Strong Passions
    by Barbara Weisberg

    Shocking revelations of a wife's adultery in 19th New York explode in an incendiary trial exposing the upper-crust and its secrets.

  • Book Jacket

    Leaving
    by Roxana Robinson

    An engrossing exploration of the vows we make to one another and what we owe to others and ourselves.

Win This Book
Win The Cleaner

The Cleaner
by Brandi Wells

Rarely has cubicle culture been depicted in such griminess or with such glee."
PW (starred review)

Enter

Wordplay

Solve this clue:

I Wouldn't T H W A T-F P

and be entered to win..

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends the best in contemporary fiction and nonfiction—books that not only engage and entertain but also deepen our understanding of ourselves and the world around us.