The Cello: Background information when reading Rooftoppers

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reviews |  Beyond the Book |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio


by Katherine Rundell

Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell X
Rooftoppers by Katherine Rundell
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

     Not Yet Rated
  • First Published:
    Sep 2013, 288 pages
    Jun 2014, 304 pages

  • Rate this book

Book Reviewed by:
Heather A Phillips

Buy This Book

About this Book

Beyond the Book:
The Cello

Print Review

cellosCello music plays a pivotal role in Rooftoppers. The cello is a string instrument played with a bow. It has four strings tuned to perfect fifths. It is an octave lower than a viola, and an octave and a fifth lower than a violin. The name "cello" is an abbreviation of the Italian violoncello, which means "little violone".

Antonio Stradivari Andrea Amati, of Cremona, Italy, is one of three people credited with the invention of the cello, and he, without question, added a 4th string to the instrument that existed at the time. His grandson, Niccolò, also a luthier (a stringed instrument maker), taught the world famous violinmaker Antonio Stradivari, who also built cellos. These original cellos were slightly larger than the modern cello. Though he had made cellos to the earlier pattern, Stradivari set the modern design in the late 1600s or early 1700s by taking the pioneering step of reducing the size. This made the cello easier to play. The change caught on quickly, and by the mid 1700s luthiers were generally using this smaller pattern. Another change to the cello came in the seventeenth century, when string-makers from Bologna, Italy started wrapping wire around their gut strings, giving the string a deeper sound and greater resonance. Previously, strings had been made only of gut, which produced a softer sound when played.

Traditionally, a cello has a spruce top, with maple used for the back, sides, and neck. Other woods, such as poplar, are sometimes used for the back and sides. The top and back are traditionally hand-carved. The top and back also have a decorative border inlay known as purfling. While purfling is attractive, it is also functional. If the instrument is dropped or struck, a crack may form at the rim of the instrument, but will spread no further. Without purfling, cracks can spread up or down the top or back. Playing, traveling and the weather all affect the cello and can increase a crack if purfling is not in place.

The 440 AllianceFew important cello concertos were written before the 19th century – with the notable exceptions of those by Vivaldi, Bach, and Haydn. Its full recognition as a solo instrument came during the Romantic era with the concertos of Schumann, Saint-Saëns and Dvořák. Mstislav Rostropovich, a Soviet cellist and conductor once said that "when the cello enters in the Dvořák Concerto, it is like a great orator." Twentieth-century composers have made the cello a standard concerto instrument.

First image: cellos
Second image: A romanticized print of Antonio Stradivari examining an instrument
Third image: The 440 Alliance, a cello rock band

This article was originally published in October 2013, and has been updated for the June 2014 paperback release. Click here to go to this issue.

This article is available to non-members for a limited time. You can also read these articles for free. For full access, become a member today.
Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" backstories
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $10 for 3 months or $35 for a year
  • More about membership!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: A Land of Permanent Goodbyes
    A Land of Permanent Goodbyes
    by Atia Abawi

    When you're a refugee, everyone has lost, at least for the time being... And the journey ...

  • Book Jacket: Auntie Poldi and the Sicilian Lions
    Auntie Poldi and the Sicilian Lions
    by Mario Giordano
    Munich matron and self-described worldly sophisticate, Isolde Oberreiter, has decided to retire to a...
  • Book Jacket: Eat the Apple
    Eat the Apple
    by Matt Young
    Truth is stranger than fiction. Matt Young's memoir tackles the space in between truth and ...
  • Book Jacket: Educated
    by Tara Westover
    Tara Westover had the kind of upbringing most of us can only imagine. She was the youngest of seven ...

First Impressions

  • Book Jacket

    The House of Broken Angels
    by Luis Alberto Urrea

    The definitive Mexican-American immigrant story from an acclaimed storyteller.
    Reader Reviews

  • Book Jacket

    Auntie Poldi and the Sicilian Lions
    by Mario Giordano

    A charming, bighearted novel starring Auntie Poldi, Sicily's newest amateur sleuth.
    Reader Reviews

Win this book!
Win The Balcony

The Balcony
by Jane Delury

A century-spanning novel-in-stories of a French village brimming with compassion, natural beauty, and unmistakable humanity.


Word Play

Sorry, we do not currently have an active wordplay!

Books that     

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends books that we believe to be best in class. Books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, that will expand your mind and challenge you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.