Excerpt from Slave by Mende Nazer, Damien Lewis, plus links to reviews, author biography & more

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reviews |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

Slave

My True Story

by Mende Nazer, Damien Lewis

Slave by Mende Nazer, Damien Lewis X
Slave by Mende Nazer, Damien Lewis
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    Jan 2004, 368 pages
    Paperback:
    Jun 2005, 352 pages

    Genres

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
BookBrowse Review Team
Buy This Book

About this Book

Print Excerpt


As we turned to run in the opposite direction, I heard my father shouting desperately for my mother. In all the panic and the confusion, we had lost her. Now I was alone with my father, running, running. He was urging me to run faster, faster. But then I tripped and fell to the ground. I remember Uran jumping out of my arms. Then, as I struggled to get up, one of the Mujahedin grabbed me and started to drag me away.

My father jumped on the raider and wrestled him to the ground. I saw my father beating the man around the head, and the man went down and didn't get up again. My father grabbed me by my arms and started to drag me away from the fighting. My legs felt as if they were being torn to pieces by the sharp stones as he pulled me away. But I didn't care about the pain. And then he hauled me to my feet and again we were running, running, running.

"Run, Mende! Run! As fast as you can!" my father shouted at me. "If the Arabs try to take you, they'll have to kill me first!"

We sprinted back towards the other end of the village. But I was tired now, really tired. I was getting weaker by the minute. My lungs ached. Then, quite suddenly, a herd of cattle fleeing from the fire stampeded into us, and I went down a second time. I felt hooves pounding over me, as I lay curled into a ball on the ground. I thought that I was going to die.

From a distance, I heard my father's panicked voice crying out, "Mende agor! Mende agor!" - "Where are you, Mende! Where are you!" I tried to shout back and make him hear me, but my throat was choked with pain and dust. My voice came out as a rasping whisper. "Ba! Ba! Ba!" I croaked - "Daddy! Daddy! Daddy!"

But my father couldn't hear me. As I lay there, petrified, with tears streaming down my face, trying to shout for my father, a man seized me from behind. He pinned me down, with his stubbly beard pricking the back of my neck. I could smell the ugly stench of his breath.

I knew that my father was somewhere nearby, searching desperately for me. I kept trying to shout for him. But the man clamped his grubby hand over my mouth. "Shut up," he hissed, in Arabic. "Shut up and lie still. If you keep shouting, the other men will find you and they will kill you."

He dragged me to my feet and started to march me through the village. By the light of the burning huts, I could see that he had a curved dagger and a pistol tucked into a belt at his waist.

As I was led away, I'm sure I heard my father still shouting for me, "Mende! Mende! Mende!" My father was the bravest man in the world. I knew that he would save me if only he could find me, even if he had to fight every Mujahedin in the village. I wanted to shout out "Ba! Ba! I'm here! I can hear you." But the raider kept his hand clamped over my mouth.

As we walked, I could see the village burning and I could hear screams all around me. I saw Nuba women on the ground with Mujahedin on top of them, pawing at their bodies. I could smell the stench of burning, of blood, and of terror.

I prayed to God then; "Oh Allah, Oh Allah, please save me, please save me." And I prayed to God to save my family, too. Over and over as I was taken away to the forest, I kept praying to God that we might all be saved.

We arrived at the edge of the forest. Beneath the trees there were about thirty other children huddled together. More Mujahedin kept arriving, bringing young Nuba boys and girls with them. The raiders' clothes and knives were covered in blood and they had the look of absolute evil about them. As they arrived, I heard them chanting at the tops of their voices; "Allahu Akhbar! Allahu Akhbar!" Allahu Akhbar!" - "God is Great! God is Great! God is Great!"

I had no idea if any of my family had escaped, or if they had all been killed in the raid. I had no idea what would happen to me now.

This is how my wonderful, happy childhood ended and how my life as a slave began.

  • 1
  • 2

Copyright 2003 by Mende Nazer and Damien Lewis.  All rights reserved.

Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" articles
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $12 for 3 months or $39 for a year.
  • More about membership!

Join BookBrowse

Become a Member and discover books that entertain, engage & enlighten.

Find out more

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: Best Laid Plans
    Best Laid Plans
    by Gwen Florio
    When starting a series, first impressions are key. Introducing a sympathetic or relatable ...
  • Book Jacket: Last Night at the Telegraph Club
    Last Night at the Telegraph Club
    by Malinda Lo
    Author Malinda Lo takes readers to Chinatown, San Francisco in 1954, where 17-year-old Lily Hu is ...
  • Book Jacket: No One Is Talking About This
    No One Is Talking About This
    by Patricia Lockwood
    If anyone knows the ins and outs of living online, it's Patricia Lockwood. Before her stellar memoir...
  • Book Jacket: A Thousand Ships
    A Thousand Ships
    by Natalie Haynes
    Recent years have seen a trend in reinventions of Greek myths and legends, some from the ...

Readers Recommend

  • Book Jacket

    Black Widows
    by Cate Quinn

    A brilliant joyride in the company of three sister-wives with nothing in common except their dead husband.

    Reader Reviews
Book Club Discussion
Book Jacket
The Narrowboat Summer
by Anne Youngson
From the author of Meet Me at the Museum, a charming novel of second chances.
Win This Book!
Win Band of Sisters

Band of Sisters
by Lauren Willig

"A crackling portrayal of everyday American heroines…A triumph."
— Fiona Davis

Enter

Wordplay

Solve this clue:

P G Before A F

and be entered to win..

Books that     
entertain,
     engage

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends the best in contemporary fiction and nonfiction—books that not only engage and entertain but also deepen our understanding of ourselves and the world around us.