Read advance reader review of Nothing to See Here by Kevin Wilson

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Nothing to See Here

by Kevin Wilson

Nothing to See Here by Kevin Wilson X
Nothing to See Here by Kevin Wilson
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  • Publishes in USA 
    Nov 5, 2019
    272 pages
    Genre: Novels

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There are currently 35 member reviews
for Nothing to See Here
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  • Cassandra E. (Bonita Springs, FL)


    Nothing to See Here
    Not sure where he got the idea of the title but what a delightful book. I don't think I could have done what Lillian did. Her boring life became anything but boring. Helping out an old friend who took advantage of her years ago, does it again. The kids didn't have a normal upbringing and the bursting in flames at strange times was not their fault. All Lillian wanted to bring some normal everyday life to the kids. Not sure what to do she just winged it. I think she was trying to be what she had wanted her mom to do. Just be a mom and it had not happened. Lillian was going to be a mom. I think she do a great job. With all that went on in one summer she did a pretty good job. And the youngest was added to the pot, but Madison stepped up to the plate. As some one had said, all's well that ends well. Happy Ending.
  • Maggie R. (Canoga Park, CA)


    Oh, we need to talk about Kevin Wilson
    From the cover through the last page, there was a lot to see and enjoy here. The central conceit - children who burst into flame when agitated - belies the lightness and sweetness of the central relationship of children and caregiver. There are no true monsters here. Misguided adults, yes, but those are a dime a dozen in fiction and real life. Highly recommend!
  • Kenan R. (Liberty, MO)


    All the Feels!
    Charming, quirky, delightful... I am probably the 367th person who has used these adjectives to describe Kevin Wilson's book, but I am at a loss as to what other words could suffice. Parenting is often a job of degrees. What can I do to keep my kid from bursting into flames - metaphorically for most of us, but quite literally for protagonist Lillian. We strive to maintain a balance, keeping them safe and happy while letting them be as much themselves as the possibly can be. I think Mr. Wilson's enchanting (another adjective!) tale articulates perfectly the ennui of parenting, the giant wallop upside the head loving your kiddos is, and the constant worry that you are doing it all wrong. This novel could have gone over-the-top insane really quickly, and instead was a fantastic and heartwarming treatise on love, friendship, and being OK with the "weird" in the people you care about.
  • Alison F. (Clearwater, FL)


    Burning Love
    I am so happy to have read Kevin Wilson's most recent novel, Nothing to See Here. As you can imagine, a book with children who spontaneously combust will have some excitement for sure but mostly this story is about parental live, good and bad. It's also about class and fear that we have to fit in and be normal. Such a happy, sweet and well-written book. My favorite this year.
  • Jamie K. (Berkeley, CA)


    Plenty to See Here
    I love this quirky, honest, and thoroughly enjoyable read. The plot, although predictable at times, rings with humor and heart as it explores the intricacies of trust, acceptance, success, and above all, what it means to be a parent. Life gets very complicated when Lilian is asked by longtime, but not recently seen, high school friend Madison to be a temporary caretaker for a pair of twins moving into the mansion she shares with her senator husband (their father) and young son Timothy. Easy-peasy, except for one thing— these guys have an unusual habit of spontaneously combusting when agitated or angered. The twins and Lilian see this as a gift; the senator who dreams of a greater political future— sees it as a liability, and Madison, she just doesn't know what to think.

    Nothing to See Here is full of surprises. The characters are well conceived and believable (as believable as children catching on fire can be), and the plot so unique, that with some twists and turns and some very good writing, it shows you that when you play with fire, you're never quite sure who's going to get burned.
  • Sarah M. (Kirksville, MO)


    New Fabulism at its best
    Readers will root for Lillian, the tough-as-nails yet vulnerable heroine, as she takes on the challenge of caring for two traumatized children who catch fire when emotionally overwhelmed. Wilson's deft use of spontaneous combustion as a symbol of trauma, healing, and cathartic acceptance is deeply satisfying. Readers new to new fabulism as a genre will be wowed, while fans of Karen Russell, Aimee Bender, and George Saunders will love this novel and will want to seek out more of Wilson's work.
  • Mary S. (Bow, NH)


    Normal weirdness
    A longtime fan of The Family Fang, I had high expectations for Nothing to See Here and I wasn't disappointed. Each character was so well defined and all of their quirks and foibles served to enrich the story-telling. The pacing was excellent and it was easy to become engrossed and keep reading even though it was way past your bedtime. All in all, an excellent read.

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