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Read advance reader review of Children of the Jacaranda Tree by Sahar Delijani, page 6 of 6

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Children of the Jacaranda Tree

by Sahar Delijani

Children of the Jacaranda Tree by Sahar Delijani X
Children of the Jacaranda Tree by Sahar Delijani
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  • First Published:
    Jun 2013, 288 pages
    Paperback:
    Jun 2014, 288 pages

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Page 6 of 6
There are currently 37 member reviews
for Children of the Jacaranda Tree
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  • Amy G. (Bowie, MD)
    "What is life...but a long lullaby of separation?"
    I am not sure if this novel is supposed to be a set of short stories, or a novel that never really came together, and by the end, I wasn't sure I really cared. The characters never made an impact on me, so it was difficult to remember who was who. Also, the timing of the stories jumped forward (and back) in time with little to no warning, it frustrated me to distraction.

    One thing that was very evident in this novel is the author's belief in (and experience with) the notion that those who suffer during a political revolution are not the only affected generation. In the end, violence and loss come full circle from the mothers in the beginning of the book to their sons and daughters, represented later in the book.
  • Darlene C. (Simpsonville, SC)
    Children of the Jacaranda Tree by Sahar Delijani
    I found this book difficult to read. I think it was because the characters (of which there were many) were not fully developed enough for me to create a memorable mental image of them. Therefore I found myself flipping back and forth to find out who was who and how they related to the others. I had a similar problem with the passage of time. The writing itself was well done but perhaps more focus on less characters would have made it more readable for me. I'm sorry, but for me this was an "I have to finish it because I have to review it book".

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