Summary and book reviews of Some Go Home by Odie Lindsey

Some Go Home

by Odie Lindsey

Some Go Home by Odie Lindsey X
Some Go Home by Odie Lindsey
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

     Not Yet Rated
  • Published:
    Jul 2020, 304 pages

    Genres

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
Jane McCormack
Buy This Book

About this Book

Book Summary

A searing debut novel that follows three generations - fractured by murder, seeking redemption - in fictional Pitchlynn, Mississippi.

An Iraq War veteran turned small-town homemaker, Colleen works hard to keep her deployment behind her―until pregnancy brings her buried trauma to the surface. She hides her mounting anxiety from her husband, Derby, who is in turn preoccupied with the retrial of his father, Hare Hobbs, for a decades-old, civil rights–era murder. Colleen and Derby's community, including the descendants of the murder victim, still grapple with the fallout; corrections officer Doc and his wife, Jessica, have built their life in the shadow of this violent act.

As a media frenzy builds, questions of Hare's guilt―and of the townsfolks' potential complicity in the crime―only magnify the ever-present tensions of class and race, tied always to the land and who can call it their own. At the center of these lingering questions is Wallis House, an antebellum estate that has recently passed to new hands. A brick-and-mortar representation of a town trying to erase its past, Wallis House is both the jewel of a gentrifying 2010s Pitchlynn, and the scene of the 1964 murder itself. When fresh violence erupts on the property grounds, the battle between old Pitchlynn and new, between memorial site and moving on, forces a reckoning and irreparable loss.

Some Go Home twists together personal and collective history, binding north Mississippi to northside Chicago, in a richly textured, explosive depiction of both the American South and our larger cultural legacy.

2

Then it was August. Sweltering, dead-grass August. She was on the couch, in a peach-colored bathrobe, third trimester. Derby had already called four times that morning; Colleen hadn't picked up, but only listened to the answering machine. He wasn't so much checking in on her as he was checking up, exercising his own anxiety. He'd been coiled extra-tight since seeing his father back in the news, as if the old man were anything more than a gust of scorched air (or as if a phone call to Colleen could protect her if he wasn't).

Instead of talking things out, Derby had doubled down on domestic regimen: check-ins, check-ons, grocery lists, chores, and reporting for daily duty at a house-flip gig in Pitchlynn.

Derby Friar, Derby Friar, his jeans forever tucked into his stiff leather ropers. Once a year, he bought a pair of tan, pull-on Red Wing work boots. He spent twelve months scuffing them, wearing them in proper . . . then bought another new pair, and started ...

Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" articles
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $12 for 3 months or $39 for a year.
  • More about membership!

Reviews

BookBrowse Review

BookBrowse

At first blush, Some Go Home explores veteran Colleen Friar's acclimation back to her hometown of Pitchlynn, Mississippi following her deployment. Yet the novel also addresses the idea that home is an amalgamation of people and places, lineage and legacy. Some Go Home explores how a place can leave an indelible mark...continued

Full Review Members Only (632 words).

(Reviewed by Jane McCormack).

Media Reviews

BookPage
Told in hypnotic and at times sharp-witted prose, Some Go Home asks what land means to us, what we will do for that land and who we’ll become along the way. It’s a story of class and race intersections, of how the haves often send the have-nots to do their bidding. With racially motivated violence and scenes of animal cruelty, Some Go Home is often difficult to read as it reflects on trauma, war, family and how the sins and shortcomings of our ancestors replay in our own lives. It’s a relevant story that begs us to reconcile the past with the present so that we can finally begin to move forward.

Kirkus Reviews
Some characters are underdrawn...But the novel has some sturdy support beams in its central characters...A compassionate and complex debut, assuredly encompassing post–Iraq War fiction and old-fashioned Southern gothic.

Library Journal
Smooth and evocative, the writing truly brings the town of Pitchlynn to life. A fine first novel in the lasting tradition of Southern fiction.

Publishers Weekly (starred review)
[I]ncandescent...In dazzling prose, the author lassos complex subjects with acuity, from the legacy of racism in Mississippi to internecine class wars, the horror of combat, and the joy and terror of becoming a mother. This is a consummate portrait of human fragility and grim determination.

Author Blurb Kevin Powers, National Book Award finalist and author of The Yellow Birds
Some Go Home is an extraordinary novel. It is lived-in in its particulars, told in energetic and evocative prose, and has as much insight into the peculiar ways the past informs the present as any book you're likely to encounter this year. But more than that, Odie Lindsey seems to have a notion about what all that might mean for where we're headed, and not just for those of us with some connection to the American South, but for any human being attempting to go forth in a world as strange as ours in a time as strange as this.

Author Blurb Katy Simpson Smith, author of The Everlasting
Some Go Home reckons with blood ties, buried secrets, and the poisons of possession, reminding us that race and class sit inside each other, in permanent headlock. This is staccato realism; these sentences pop in the mouth like blackberries. 'You needed lies to make memory,' one character cautions. To make fiction you need truth, and Lindsey offers it here in crystalline quantity.

Author Blurb Tom Franklin, New York Times best-selling author of Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter
Some Go Home is both timely and timeless, its prose crackling and sparkling with energy and humor and characters who by the end are as real as the people next door. Terrific, just plain terrific.

Author Blurb Randall Kenan, author of Let the Dead Bury Their Dead
Some Go Home has the grit, power, and soul of Janis Joplin and the hardscrabble depth of Johnny Cash. Odie Lindsey brings Pitchlynn and north Mississippi to life better than anybody's business—you will recognize the landscape, the language, and the people as real…Some Go Home will have a long and happy life in the American mind. This novel is nothing short of thrilling.

Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" articles
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $12 for 3 months or $39 for a year.
  • More about membership!

Beyond the Book

Racism and Ronald Reagan's 1980 States' Rights Speech

Civil rights workers James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Mickey Schwerner In Some Go Home, author Odie Lindsey references then-presidential candidate Ronald Reagan's "states' rights" speech as the vehicle that "had re-radicalized Hare's power, breathing life into his limp narrative." Lindsey implies that the candidate's speech allowed the fictional character Hare Hobbs to create an illusion of power for himself by working along with others to suppress the civil rights movement surrounding them. The author aptly notes that Reagan had "issued formal cover for their cause." Indeed, many white voters construed the speech, which criticized federal social initiatives such as welfare, as tacit approval of racism and classism. Reagan's bid for presidency, as well as the Republican party's desire for control, served ...

Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" articles
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $12 for 3 months or $39 for a year.
  • More about membership!

Readalikes

Readalikes Full readalike results are for members only

More books by Odie Lindsey

If you liked Some Go Home, try these:

Non-members are limited to two results. Become a member
Search Readalikes again
How we choose readalikes
Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" articles
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $12 for 3 months or $39 for a year.
  • More about membership!

Support BookBrowse

Become a Member and discover books that entertain, engage & enlighten.

Join Now!


Today's Top Picks

  • Book Jacket: White Too Long
    White Too Long
    by Robert P. Jones
    Religious scholar Robert P. Jones doesn't pull any punches in his latest book, White Too Long: The ...
  • Book Jacket: Caste
    Caste
    by Isabel Wilkerson
    In 2020, the word "racist" remains taboo. Conceptually, racism is so culturally unacceptable, so ...
  • Book Jacket: The Deepest South of All
    The Deepest South of All
    by Richard Grant
    Author Richard Grant frequently uses his wanderlust to explore diverse stories that create a complex...
  • Book Jacket: Piranesi
    Piranesi
    by Susanna Clarke
    Our First Impressions readers were delighted with this speculative novel by Susanna Clarke, her ...

Readers Recommend

  • Book Jacket

    The Blind Light
    by Stuart Evers

    A multigenerational story about two families bound together by the tides of history.
    Reader Reviews

Book Club Discussion
Book Jacket
Where the Light Enters
by Sara Donati

An enthralling epic about two trailblazing female doctors in 19th century New York.

About the book
Join the discussion!
Win this book!
Win Agent Sonya

Agent Sonya: Moscow's Most Daring Wartime Spy

Master storyteller Ben Macintyre tells the true story behind the Cold War's most intrepid female spy.

Enter


Wordplay

Solve this clue:

I I M B T Give T T R

and be entered to win..

Books that     
entertain,
     engage

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends the best in contemporary fiction and nonfiction—books that not only engage and entertain but also deepen our understanding of ourselves and the world around us.