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The Dry
Winner of the 2017 BookBrowse Debut Novel Award
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The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

Created: 12/27/17

Replies: 20

Posted Dec. 27, 2017 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
davinamw

Join Date: 10/15/10

Posts: 1392

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The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?


Posted Jan. 01, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
renem

Join Date: 12/01/16

Posts: 105

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RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

The prologue lets the reader begin to get the feeling that things are dying in Kiewarra. People, farms, and the town itself are all in trouble.


Posted Jan. 01, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
robertaw

Join Date: 04/20/16

Posts: 4

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

It makes the murders seem more grisly and somehow a bit more terrifying.


Posted Jan. 02, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
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alwaysdaddygirl

Join Date: 09/04/16

Posts: 44

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

I understand that it was to emphasize a tragic death scene and a dying town but I feel that it was a mediocre way to start a novel. I mean this with all due respect. I understand this is her first book. The author introduction has similarities to other authors, including New York best selling authors. These others authors made it with more spice.


"Here's to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes... the ones who see things differently -- they're not fond of rules... You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can't do is ignore them because they change things... they push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do."
Steve Jobs
Posted Jan. 02, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
Janet Smith

Join Date: 07/28/14

Posts: 7

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

This prologue drew me into the book. Curious as to why were there flies? And, had to know that someone/something had been killed. It had me intrigued and wanted to know more. Effective technique by the author.


Posted Jan. 02, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
paulak

Join Date: 04/21/11

Posts: 26

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

The sense of decay is pervasive and is an ongoing theme throughout the novel: the decay of relationships, of the town itself due to the heat-related stressors and the decay of what we believe to be true.


Posted Jan. 02, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
Loveslife

Join Date: 08/01/15

Posts: 9

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

The flies seemed to represent the cycle of life and death. The town is caught in terrible drought that affects it inhabitants everyday life. As a reader, I was quickly drawn into the story with this small representation of how impersonal the natural world is in the face of human tragedy.


Posted Jan. 03, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
susiej

Join Date: 10/15/14

Posts: 118

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RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

This image creates a sinister scene and mood - something is rotting and wasted. It creates a strong foreshadowing for the setting and the events that follow, sets a solid tone for the entire novel.


Posted Jan. 06, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
Suzanne

Join Date: 04/21/11

Posts: 239

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RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

Flies are prevalent when the weather is hot, and if they're able to access decaying food, they swarm. This is gross and makes these deaths even more gruesome. That, in turn, urged me to find out more about these dirty murders . . . .


Posted Jan. 06, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
lynnw

Join Date: 09/01/11

Posts: 141

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RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

The beginning was set to give the reader a feel of what the area was like. The title The Dry was made very clear from the beginning all through the book until the end when being so dry could have destroyed the entire town and everyone in it.


Posted Jan. 07, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
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alwaysdaddygirl

Join Date: 09/04/16

Posts: 44

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

Aloha Lynnw,

The title of the book is clear. Regardless, I felt it could have been done better. This book was dry. It was easy to predict. Anyone that read enough murder, thriller and suspense books could figure out who was the bad guy. The ending was horrible!

This is a link to the article that explains how certain books and why they were best for the title, etc.:
https://litreactor.com/columns/the-top-10-best-opening-lines-of novels

Each there own.


"Here's to the crazy ones, the misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in the square holes... the ones who see things differently -- they're not fond of rules... You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them, but the only thing you can't do is ignore them because they change things... they push the human race forward, and while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the ones who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do."
Steve Jobs
Posted Jan. 08, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
johnw

Join Date: 03/11/12

Posts: 39

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

The prologue captured my attention immediately, growing up in the country wildlife often becomes roadkill and hot summer days flies swarming became synonymous with death and decay. Initially I thought it symbolized the deaths, but soon discovered it represented far more than the death of this family, the town and small towns everywhere.


Posted Jan. 08, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
Missys

Join Date: 10/24/17

Posts: 12

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

Living on a farm with livestock means that nasty flies are a part of life around here. Our summers are scorchers and the flies are always horrible given we have cows all around our house. For me, the introduction of flies swarming at a murder scene painted a very vivid disgusting picture. Flies love decay and frenzy over it, which definitely set the tone for the novel. Everything is dying and decaying, even some souls.


Posted Jan. 08, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
JulieAB

Join Date: 07/16/13

Posts: 52

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RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

I think the prologue set up the horrendous scene and immediately hooked the reader.


Posted Jan. 09, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
Peggy H

Join Date: 06/13/11

Posts: 199

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RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

The flies are part of the beginning and other scenes, including the ruin of Aaron's car. They are used to set the scene of a dying city, with a school that needs outside help, as well as a policemen willing to enlist the help of a former resident. Life with fire, water, and flights of insects. The author uses these parts of nature to develop her setting and its role in the novel.


Pegh
Posted Jan. 09, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
ruthiea

Join Date: 02/03/14

Posts: 96

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RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

I agree that the presence of flies at a murder scene sets the tone and reference the town's dying state, the crops dying, the drought, the decay, the ugliness of the crime, of death. A lot of importance is given to "opening sentences" these days, many feel that the author must draw the reader in quickly due to shortened attention spans etc.

Flies are often a sign that there is also neglect - food not put away, garbage not picked up, bodies not discovered, and this town is neglected, Ellie was neglected (why didn't her mother take her when she fled?), farms are neglected....


Posted Jan. 10, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
Joni

Join Date: 11/04/17

Posts: 6

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

The prologue drew me in right away. I like when authors are able to do this. When a book starts out slow I tend to put it aside and grab another from my ever-growing tbr pile.


Posted Jan. 12, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
janen

Join Date: 06/01/11

Posts: 41

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

Tis prologue set the tone for what is too come. Things are dying in this town and the creature that are drawn to death, both animal and human are drawn to it. It also sets a tome of revulsion. Flies on a corpse are disgusting, and, as it turns out, the town feels the same way about Luke when they think that he committed a murder/suicide.


Posted Jan. 13, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
samanthaa

Join Date: 01/13/18

Posts: 3

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

The opening of the novel is haunting. Everything is quiet. The closest person alive is a distance away. The author makes a point of stating this. Then she walks you through the house. There is no noise. Its all quiet and then you can imagine the sound of the flies haunting the setting. You can feel the heat and the heaviness with the description. The description of the flies sets a mood of uneasiness and uncomfortableness. The deaths of course make the community uncomfortable. The flies emphasize this. It would be a great opening scene for the big screen.


Posted Jan. 14, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
sylviaann

Join Date: 01/14/18

Posts: 5

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

As soon as I read that opening sentence, I was HOOKED. I actually had to stop to gather myself, because it had an instant impact. It sent shivers down my spine.


Posted Jan. 14, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
sylviaann

Join Date: 01/14/18

Posts: 5

RE: The novel begins with a prologue that describes flies being drawn to the scene of the murders. Why is this approach such a powerful way to introduce the events of the novel?

As soon as I read that opening sentence, I was HOOKED. I actually had to stop to gather myself, because it had an instant impact. It sent shivers down my spine.


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