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Free: Book summary and reviews of Free by Lea Ypi

Free

A Child and a Country at the End of History

by Lea Ypi

Free by Lea Ypi X
Free by Lea Ypi
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About this book

Book Summary

A reflection on "freedom" in a dramatic, beautifully written memoir of the end of Communism in the Balkans. Longlisted for the 2021 Baillie Gifford Prize for Non-Fiction.

Lea Ypi grew up in the last Stalinist country in Europe: Albania, a place of queuing and scarcity, of political executions and secret police. While family members disappeared to what she was told were "universities" from which few "graduated," she swore loyalty to the Party. In her eyes, people were equal, neighbors helped each other, and children were expected to build a better world.

Then the statues of Stalin and Hoxha were toppled. Almost overnight, people could vote and worship freely, and invest in hopes of striking it rich. But factories shut, jobs disappeared, and thousands fled to Italy, only to be sent back. Pyramid schemes bankrupted the country, leading to violence. One generation's dreams became another's disillusionment. As her own family's secrets were revealed, Ypi found herself questioning what "freedom" really means. With acute insight and wit, Ypi traces the perils of ideology, and what people need to flourish.

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Reviews

Media Reviews

"Illuminating and subversive, Free asks us to consider what happens to our ideals when they come into contact with imperfect places and people and what can be salvaged from the wreckage of the past." ― Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran

"I haven't in many years read a memoir from this part of the world as warmly inviting as this one. Written by an intellectual with story-telling gifts, Free makes life on the ground in modern day Albania vivid and immediate: no mean accomplishment." ― Vivian Gornick, author of The Odd Woman and the City

"Free is one of those very rare books that shows how history shapes people's lives and their politics. Lea Ypi is such a brilliant, powerful writer that her story becomes your story." ― Ivan Krastev, author of The Light that Failed

"A lyrical memoir, of deep and affecting power, of the sweet smell of humanity mingled with flesh, blood and hope." ― Philippe Sands, author of The Ratline

"Lea Ypi's teenage journey through the endtimes of Albanian communism tells a universal story: ours is an age of collapsed illusions for many generations. Written by one of Europe's foremost left-wing thinkers, this is an unmissable book for anyone engaged in the politics of resistance." ― Paul Mason, author of Postcapitalism

"Lea Ypi is a pathbreaking philosopher who is also becoming one of the most important public thinkers of our time. Here she draws on her unique historical experience to shed new light on the questions of freedom that matter to all of us. This extraordinary book is both personally moving and politically revolutionary. If we take its lessons to heart, it can help to set us free." ― Martin Hägglund, author of This Life

"Free is a new classic that bursts out of the global silence of Albania to tell us human truths about the politics of the past hundred years, from Marxism to socialism to the enforced austerity and "structural reforms" that shaped many of the world's formerly communist countries after the upheaval of 1989.... Though nonfiction, it unfolds with revelation after revelation―both familial and national―as if written by a master novelist, right through cruel tragedies to an inevitable redemption. As if it were, say, a novella by Tolstoy. Truths become lies, lies truths. Albania's recent history opens up to the reader like a door to an examination room where we can inspect and question the political truths we've accepted in our own lifetime, and their validity...You never forget how lucky you are to be reading Free, and how much you are learning about our world. A literary triumph." ― Amy Wilentz, author of Farewell, Fred Voodoo: A Letter From Haiti, and other books

"This extraordinary coming-of-age story is like an Albanian Educated but it is so much more than that.  It beautifully brings together the personal and the political to create an unforgettable account of oppression, freedom and what it means to acquire knowledge about the world.  Funny, moving but also deadly serious, this book will be read for years to come." ― David Runciman, author of How Democracy Ends

"Thought-provoking, deliciously funny, poignant, sharply observed and beautifully written, this is a childhood memoir like very few others―a really marvelous book." ― Noel Malcolm, author of Agents of Empire

" A probing personal history, poignant and moving. A young life unfolding amidst great historical change – ideology, war, loss, uncertainty. This is history brought memorably and powerfully to life." ― Tara Westover, author of Educated

This information about Free shown above was first featured in "The BookBrowse Review" - BookBrowse's membership magazine, and in our weekly "Publishing This Week" newsletter. In most cases, the reviews are necessarily limited to those that were available to us ahead of publication. If you are the publisher or author and feel that the reviews shown do not properly reflect the range of media opinion now available, please send us a message with the mainstream media reviews that you would like to see added.

Any "Author Information" displayed below reflects the author's biography at the time this particular book was published.

Reader Reviews

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Mel F. (Auburn, MA)

Free-a memoir of growing up in Albania during a changing political landscape and impacts on ideological beliefs
This is a compelling novel in which the author recounts her childhood and maturity in Albania in the late 1980s and extending into the late 1990s when there was an extreme change in Albania's political landscape. The regime changed from communism under the leadership of politician, Enver Hoxha (referred to as Uncle Enver), to a parliamentary republic. It was during this period that the author experienced an ideological maturity about the concept of freedom.

Her story poignantly begins when she is a young girl clutching a decapitated statue of Stalin because she learned in school that he was the man who changed the world. She runs to this statue to seek refuge from protestors (her father called them hooligans) who are clamoring for freedom and democracy. That is what triggers her to question the concept of freedom. As the author states later in the novel: "That is the day that I lost my childhood innocence." Her family acts and describes their family history in terms of normalcy; however, she later learns they deceived her. The universities they attended were a ruse for prisons/deportation sites, curriculums were a variety of criminal offenses, and a degree of completion was the end of a prison sentence. The ultimate deception was that her family heritage included a Populist Part Prime Minister she detested.

Her teenage years were also tumultuous because Albania's road to democracy required multiple transitions- political, economic, social, and European integration. The environment was chaotic with violent protests, political corruption, pyramid schemes and widespread bankruptcies which sparked the Albanian Civil War of 1997. This period also resulted in significant ideological shifts in her parents and other Albanians.

This book is a beautifully written memoir reflecting not only the author's emotions but the formation of her strong political beliefs. It is well suited to someone knowledgeable in political science or who is interested in nonfiction with historical and philosophical depth. While I was unfamiliar with this topical area, it expanded my perspective on the impacts of changing political conditions on ideological beliefs. At the novel's conclusion, it caused me to contemplate - Is freedom a concept defined in the eye of the beholder?

Rosemary C. (Golden, CO)

Thought-provoking
I thoroughly enjoyed the book. Ypi is a gifted writer who creates a vivid picture of her coming of age during the political and cultural changes in her home country of Albania. The stories she tells personalize the effects of these dramatic changes on her family and others in her community. She is at times humorous and witty, always passionate and seeking the truth.
I think this would be an excellent choice for a book group, allowing discussions about how the adults in her life protected her by not telling her the truths about the system under which they lived, but also exploring the ways in which political philosophies are distorted by those who claim to be creating a society based on them.

Patricia W. (Desoto, TX)

Free
I found Lea Ypi's personal story of growing up in Albania during socialism and then as the country transitioned from socialism to political pluralism engrossing to read. It was enlightening to learn what she was taught in school, including how to think about her country. One of the most interesting aspects of the book was reading about the different perspectives of three generations: parents, grandmother, and daughter/granddaughter. Unlike Lea, her parents and grandmother had experienced life before socialism. I didn't realize how difficult the transition to democracy is for countries and for individuals. This book reminded me to think about what it means to be free and what freedom is. I will recommend it to my friends.

Patricia L. (Seward, AK)

Search for Utopia
Some time ago, during an extended stay on a remote beach, a few friends and I tried to imagine the perfect society. We were different ages, and came from opposite ends of the earth. After a few drinks and multiple attempts at creating this ideal nation, ultimately someone would say: "But for that to work some people would have to die!" Then with a resigned sigh of agreement we would go back to the drawing board.
In Free: A Child and a Country at the End of History, the author Lea Ypi recounts her experience as a young child in Marxist-Leninist Albania, and as a teen during the messy transition to a Socialist democracy just as the Soviet Union began to collapse. She pointedly recalls advocates of both systems regaling how free she and her friends and family would be once their goals were reached. Yet, as my friends surmised and Ypi remembers, freedom can have many interpretations, limits and degrees.
Born into a family with a "biography" of "liberals and liberalism" Ypi continually wondered why her parents didn't have pictures of the Party leaders prominently displayed in their home. The author's early teacher was Nora, a strict Party representative, who succinctly answered questions with sanctioned responses assuring the receptive students of the freedom that the Party promised. While her family didn't directly dispute Nora they did not readily agree. During her early teens she experienced the nuances of her family "biography" as she navigated high school and social activities. Only later upon reflection did she realize that the family had communicated with a kind of code to describe their history and that much of what she thought she knew was actually quite the opposite.
Free is readable and refreshing while providing an in-depth understanding of "foreign" culture and governments as experienced by those being governed. Ypi would have been welcomed as a seasoned voice in those long ago campfire summits. Highly recommended.

Sylvia F. (Lincoln, CA)

FREE by Lea Ypi
I found this book very informative about Albania, a country the world does not know. The author's description of her childhood in the 1980's had both humor and information of how a child could be happy living in a strict socialism society. It was interesting to learn how the adults had to speak in code around a child who loved Stalin and Uncle Enver. I felt her confusion and frustration when her country changed to a free society that eventually led to a civil war. This book led me to search on the internet for the history of Albania.
This well written memoir was hard to put down and left the reader thinking democracy is not for everyone.

Bonne O. (Hartwell, GA)

Is freedom really free?
What I loved about this book was the way such a significant historical event as the collapse of the Soviet Union was presented. Lea Ypi's memoir of living through Albania's abrupt transition of socialism to the formerly maligned capitalism provides a realism that could never be duplicated in a history book. Belief systems for millions of people are uprooted. The author sites numerous examples, some humorous, some tragic, of her family and others suddenly experiencing free speech, free elections, free markets, and open borders. Free also gives the reader a rare glimpse of daily life in a socialist society where the collective is paramount, religion is nonexistent, propaganda is preached in the schools, goods are limited or scarce, and praise for the leader is embedded in all aspects of life. Despite a universal desire for democracy and freedom, the author causes the reader to reflect on the price that one actually pays for freedom.
"Free" should be required reading in all high school and college world history classes.

...13 more reader reviews

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Author Information

Lea Ypi

Lea Ypi is a professor of political theory at the London School of Economics, and a prominent left-wing voice in Europe. She lives in London and contributes regularly to the Guardian.

(Ypi is pronounced Ee-P - just as you would say the letters E P).

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