Excerpt from The Twelve Tribes of Hattie by Ayana Mathis, plus links to reviews, author biography & more

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reading Guide |  Reviews |  Beyond the Book |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie

By Ayana Mathis

The Twelve Tribes of Hattie
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • Hardcover: Jan 2013,
    256 pages.
    Paperback: Oct 2013,
    256 pages.

    Publication Information

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
Sarah Sacha Dollacker

Buy This Book

About this Book

Print Excerpt

 
"I'm so ashamed," Hattie said. "I'm so ashamed."
 
"Hattie, listen to me. Our little baby isn't anything to be ashamed of."
 
She shook her head. Later that evening, and for years to come, he would wonder if he had misunderstood her, if her shame wasn't at having a child with him but something larger that he didn't understand, and if it wasn't his failure to grasp this that had doomed them. But in that moment, he thought she only needed convincing, so he talked about renting her a house in Baltimore, where he'd grown up, and how they'd bring her children from Philadelphia and what it would all be like.
 
Hattie's eyes were red-rimmed, and she kept glancing over Lawrence's shoulder. He had never seen her so skittish, so in need of him. For the first time, Lawrence felt Hattie was his. This was not proprietary but something all together more profound— he was accountable to her, wonderfully and honorably obliged to take care of her. Lawrence was forty years old. He realized that whatever he'd experienced with other women— lust? infatuation?— had not been love.
 
 Hattie was incredulous. She refused him.
 
"This is our chance," Lawrence said. "I'm telling you, we won't ever get over it, we won't ever forgive ourselves if we don't do this. Baby."
 
"But do you still . . . ?" she asked.
 
Lawrence had discussed his gambling in passing. He had told Hattie he made his living for the most part as a porter on the trains, which had been true for a few months many years ago. Hattie's uncertainty made Lawrence understand that she did not take his gambling as lightly as he had supposed.
 
"I'll stop," he said. "I already have, really. It's just a game or two when it's slow with the trains."
 
Hattie wept in heavy wracking sobs that shook her shoulders and upset Ruthie.
 
"I'll stop," he said again.
 
Lawrence slid next to Hattie on the banquette. He leaned down and kissed his daughter's forehead. He kissed Hattie's temple and her tears and the corner of her mouth. When she calmed, Hattie rested her head on his shoulder.
 
"I couldn't stand to be a fool a second time," Hattie said. "I couldn't stand it."
 
 
Hattie had hardly spoken during the four- hour drive to Baltimore. Lawrence's was the only car on the highway— his high beams tunneled along the black road. Such a dark and quiet night, the moon was slim as a fingernail clipping and offered no light. Lawrence accelerated to fifty miles per hour, just to hear the engine rev and feel the car shoot forward. Hattie tensed in the passenger seat.
 
"We're not too far now." He reached over and squeezed Ruthie's fat little leg. "I love you," Lawrence said. "I love you both."
 
"She's a good baby," Hattie replied.
 
August had named the baby Margaret, but Hattie and Lawrence had decided before her birth that they'd call her Ruth after Lawrence's mother. When Ruth was nine days old, Hattie brought her to meet Lawrence in a park in his neighborhood.
 
"This is your father," Hattie said, handing her to Lawrence. The baby fussed—Lawrence was a stranger to her—but he held her until she quieted. "Hush, hush, little Ruthie girl, hush, hush," he said. Tears rose in his throat when the visit ended and Hattie took the baby back to Wayne Street. In the hours and days until he next saw her, Lawrence thought of Ruthie every instant: now she is hungry, now she is asleep. Now she is cooing in the arms of the man who is not her father. It was possible, of course, that Hattie was mistaken and Ruthie was August's baby, but Lawrence knew, he knew in a way that was not logical and could not be explained, that she was his child.
 

Excerpted from The Twelve Tribes of Hattie (Oprah's Book Club 2.0) by Ayana Mathis. Copyright © 2012 by Ayana Mathis. Excerpted by permission of Knopf, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

Membership Advantages
  • Reviews
  • "Beyond the Book" backstories
  • Free books to read and review (US only)
  • Find books by time period, setting & theme
  • Read-alike suggestions by book and author
  • Book club discussions
  • and much more!
  • Just $10 for 3 months or $35 for a year
  • More about membership!

Beyond the Book:
  The Great Migration

Member Benefits

Join Now!

Check the advantages!
Just $10 for 3 months or $35 for a year

    •  
    • FREE
    • MEMBER
    • Range of media reviews for each book
    • Excerpts of all featured books
    • Author bios, interviews and pronunciations
    • Browse by genre
    • Book club discussions
    • Book club advice and reading guides
    • BookBrowse reviews and "beyond the book" back-stories
    •  
    • Reviews of notable books ahead of publication
    •  
    • Free books to read and review (US Only)
    •  
    • Browse for the best books by time period, setting & theme
    •  
    • Read-alike suggestions for thousands of books and authors
    •  
    • 'My Reading List" to keep track of your books
    •  
Sign up, win books!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: A Man Called Ove
    A Man Called Ove
    by Fredrik Backman
    Reading A Man Called Ove was like having Christmas arrive early. Set in Sweden, this debut novel is ...
  • Book Jacket
    The Search
    by Geoff Dyer
    All hail the independent publisher! In May 2014, Graywolf Press brought two of long-revered British ...
  • Book Jacket
    Mrs. Hemingway
    by Naomi Wood
    Naomi Wood's latest novel, Mrs. Hemingway, is a fictionalized biography covering in turn writer...

First Impressions

Members read and review books ahead
of publication. See what they think
in First Impressions!

Books that
expand your
horizons.

Visitors can view a lot of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only

Find out more.

Book Discussions
Book Jacket

Tomlinson Hill
by Chris Tomlinson

Published Jul. 2014

Join the discussion!

  1.  171The City:
    Dean Koontz
  2.  39The Arsonist:
    Sue Miller

All Discussions

Win this book!
Win The Angel of Losses

The Angel of Losses

"Family saga, mystery, and myth intersect in Feldman's debut novel." - Booklist

Enter

Word Play

Solve this clue:

E C H A Silver L

and be entered to win..

Books thatinspire you.Handpicked.

Books you'll stay up all night reading; books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, books that will expand your mind and inspire you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.