The BookBrowse Review

Got a question? Click here!

The BookBrowse Review

Published May 21, 2014

ISSN: 1930-0018

printable version
You are viewing a sample edition of The BookBrowse Review for members. To learn more about membership, click here.
Back   

Contents

In This Edition of
The BookBrowse Review

Highlighting indicates debut books

Editor's Introduction
Reviews
Hardcovers Paperbacks
First Impressions
Recommended for Book Clubs
Publishing Soon

Novels


Historical Fiction


Short Stories/Essays


Mysteries


Thrillers


Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Alternate History


Biographies/Memoirs


History, Science & Current Affairs


Young Adults

Novels


Romance


Extras
  • Blog:
    Give Your Old Books A New Lease on Life
  • Notable:
    @RailBookClub
  • Wordplay:
    O H Die H
  • Quote:
    A library is thought in cold storage

Give Your Old Books A New Lease on Life

Posted: May 19, 2014 05:20 PM

This is not so much a blog entry as it is a plea on behalf of people in desperate need of escape. As a book critic for several publications I receive, on average, eight-to-twelve books every month. It goes without exaggeration that books have a tendency to pile up. Stacks in every nook and corner of our small home quickly escalate from evidence of a moderate reader to hoarder status. A couple of decades ago when I first started reviewing books I simply gave them to friends or - forgive me - tossed the not-so-great ones into the recycling bin. Occasionally an editor would send me the first edition of a book that I had reviewed pre-publication, and I started donating these to my local library. I still do this, but for some reason I get sent fewer follow up first editions these days.

more

In the UK, a commuter-led book discussion group, @RailBookClub, utilizes Twitter and train station digital screens to bring recommendations to passengers...

Read the interview

O H Die H

Decipher this well-known saying and you could win the book of your choice.

For example 'K The B' = kick the bucket.

Wordplays are open to BookBrowse visitors worldwide.

Wordplays usually run for two weeks on an ongoing basis. In each contest one winner will be selected at random from the correct entries. The winner will be notified by email shortly after the draw closes.

This Wordplay will end on June 3, 2014.

Please do not use multiple email addresses to submit more than one entry from the same person - this is unfair to other visitors who play by the rules and may lead to disqualification of all entries.

This wordplay ended on 06/3/2014

Past Wordplays |  Past Winners |  Rules


Answer to the last Wordplay:


Question: O T S O Giants

Answer: On the shoulders of giants

Meaning: Each generation builds on the knowledge of the one before

Source:
This phrase is often attributed to Isaac Newton who wrote to philosopher and polymath Robert Hooke in 1676, "What Descartes did was a good step. You have added much several ways, and especially in taking the colours of thin plates into philosophical consideration. If I have seen a little further it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants."

But Newton did not originate the thought. The earliest recorded reference is by 12th century theologian John of Salisbury in his treatise on logic, Metalogicon (1159) in which he references philosopher Bernard of Chartres saying that, "we stand like dwarfs on the shoulders of giants." The full quote goes something like this:

"We are like dwarves sitting on the shoulders of giants. We see more, and things that are more distant, than they did, not because our sight is superior or because we are taller than they, but because they raise us up, and by their great stature add to ours."

Bernard de Chartres, who died about 1130, was a humanist and philosopher and head of the Cathedral school of Chartres. To this day a visual reference to the shoulders of giants can be seen in the south rose window of the cathedral which shows the four major prophets - Jerimiah, Isaiah, Ezekiel and Daniel as giant figures, and on their shoulders sit the much smaller figures of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. The visual image in the stained glas window, which was installed about a century after Bernard's death, maybe coincidental to Bernard or directly connected, we will never know; but it is not the only window of the period to show a similar scene, which include the famous rose window of Notre Dame de Paris.

(A rose window is simply a circular window that radiates out on a form suggestive of a rose.)

A library is thought in cold storage

"A library is thought in cold storage." - Herbert Samuel

Herbert SamuelBritish politician Herbert Samuel (1870-1963) was born in Liverpool, brought up in the Jewish religion and educated at University College School in Hampstead, London and Oxford University where he renounced all religious belief, declaring he would no longer adhere to any outward practice of religion.

Before becoming a Member of Parliament in 1902 he was a social worker in the London slums and, as an MP, he effected legislation that established juvenile courts and the borstal system for young offenders. In 1910 he was appointed postmaster general and was responsible for nationalizing the telephone system. As Britain's first high commissioner for Palestine (1920-25) he improved the region's economy and promoted harmony among its religious communities. After this he presided over the royal commission on the coal industry and helped to settle the general strike of May 1926. He led the Liberal Party in the House of Commons from 1931-1935 and, after being made Viscount Samuel in 1937, was leader of the Liberal party in the House of Lords from 1944-55.

As president of the British Institute of Philosophy (later the Royal Institute) for almost thirty years he wrote popular works such as Practical Ethics (1935) and Belief and Action (1937); and in his later years wrote Essays in Phyics (1951), In Search of Reality (1957) and a collaborative work, A Threefold Cord: Philosophy, Science, Religion (1961).

More Quotes

Books thatinspire you.Handpicked.

Books you'll stay up all night reading; books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, books that will expand your mind and inspire you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.