Reader reviews and comments on The Wild Trees, plus links to write your own review.

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The Wild Trees

A Story of Passion and Daring

by Richard Preston

The Wild Trees by Richard Preston X
The Wild Trees by Richard Preston
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  • First Published:
    Apr 2007, 320 pages
    Feb 2008, 320 pages

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There are currently 5 reader reviews for The Wild Trees
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M. D. Vaden of Oregon

Should be a classic according to M. D. Vaden
Some folks have said that The Wild Trees reads a bit choppy. I felt the same at first, but have a better way to explain it. The book reads comparably to sitting around a campfire sharing a story, but in writing.

It is one of few books that I hope to see become a classic.

My full review was recently updated, and has a couple of curve balls - even for folks who have read The WIld Trees. Google mdvaden The Wild Trees book review.

For an adventure story, it is richly filled with information about forests and redwoods.
M. D. Vaden of Oregon

The Wild Trees: Informative & Superlative Storytelling
The Wild Trees was interesting to me because I work with trees, have been in the redwoods, and even vacationed where one of the main character's wives was born.

The best part of the book for me, was the forest information, most of which can be verified as factual.

The only downside to the book for me, was the lack of any photographs.

Although the book is loaded with information, I discovered that Preston applied superlative descriptions to many aspects of the book.

The book is supposed to be non-fiction, but I believe that something Preston wrote about the book is fictional; an aspect dealing with the location of one of the groves.

I've been there personally, and that's how I know that for a fact:

Even if you don't enjoy reading so much about some of the people in the book, I'd recommend it for the forest and tree information if nothing else.

Even though seeing the trees in person took the wind out of the sails of Preston's writing for me, I know I will read the book again.
M. D. Vaden of Oregon

The Wild Trees, Entertaining, Informative
As one who explores in forests, and works with trees, I found the book very informative.

As for being non-fiction - it's at least 99% non-fiction. Although I do challenge Preston's claim about one grove discovery on page 82 of the book, based on my own visit to the grove.

My only real disappointment with the book was lack of photos - hey, it's a redwood book !! So I assembled a bunch of photos online of specific groves mentioned in The Wild Trees. Same page that the challenge is mentioned on.

I can say the book inspired me to go find the trees.

The book is also very entertaining. Even my 90 year old mother enjoyed it and finished reading it in about 4 days.

Aside from what I believe are a couple of discrepancies, I'd recommend the book to anyone - and have read it at least twice myself.

Readable Science
An exciting read which also presents a great amount of botanical and scientific information in a very palatable manner. We read it before we went to northern California and appreciated the extra insight we had into the Redwood Forests.
M. D. Vaden of Oregon

Very good Tree book with
Wish there was a four and a half rating. I used to give this book a 5, until I found the tree Preston described and realized that he stretched the truth and wrote for shock and awe effect.

Regarding verifiable tree and forest facts, the book is quite accurate and interesting.

Either way, if a reader is not picky and really enjoys trees and a good story, this should be a fine read, and educational too.

Odds are that Preston stretched some truth to it's limits in an attempt to keep some tree locations secret. Yes - it would be easier just to say nothing and follow the non-fiction rule to the letter.

The main challenge for me, in realizing that some comments about tree locations didn't match up to what I witnessed, was it introduced an element of doubt about other parts of the book. If Preston stretched the truth in one section, did he do it in another? But I'll give him the benefit of the doubt for now.

It seems that there is one or two characters among many in the book with whom almost any reader can identify.
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