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Secret Daughter

A Novel

by Shilpi Somaya Gowda

Secret Daughter by Shilpi Somaya Gowda
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  • Published in USA  Mar 2010
    352 pages
    Genre: Novels

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There are currently 21 reader reviews for Secret Daughter
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Michele Z. (saint james, NY) (03/03/10)

a rising author
This was an enjoyable book about love from many different family aspects. The characters were well developed and for the most part likable. The Indian culture was vividly described. It would make a good choice for a book club due to the relationship issues. I hope there are many more books by Shilpi Gowda to come!
Kimberli M. (Jessup, MD) (02/03/10)

Great Book!!
I really enjoyed Secret Daughter. It was very well written and I felt like I really knew the characters. It was really eye opening to see what life can be like in India. It was also great to see the journey that each one of the characters went on. They all grew in some way.

I cried at the end of the book, but it wasn't a bad cry. I would definitely recommend this book and will look for future books from this author. Secret Daughter is a great book for book clubs. There are many things to talk about.
Sally G. (Saint Johns, FL) (01/29/10)

Secret Daughter
I enjoyed this story of India, adoption, culture differences, families and history.

The author takes you on a journey with Somer, a singular breadth of view, only child of well-to-do parents brought up in California and her meeting and marriage to Krishnan, a fellow intern that happens to be from India.

Somer is not a bad person at all, but has the plight of an only child that has never had to share or compromise.

The contrast is in the parallel story where we meet Kavita, an Indian woman that morns the loss of two daughters, one that she gives to an orphanage and one that dies.

My favorite character is Krishnan’s mother, Sarla. As a mother-in-law she is judgmental but understanding of this new daughter-in-law and is portrayed as a wise woman and great grandmother.

Secret Daughter has deep meanings of differences in old cultures. Some can be ever so cruel but others are wonderful

I know you will want to read and savor this powerful book of strong, smart women with so much food for thought and contemplation.
Pamela H. (Winston Salem, NC) (01/27/10)

Secret Daughter, a Review
In the first chapter or so, the language seems a bit overwrought, and did not ring true to me. The California setting seemed a bit bland and stereotypical. The book really got interesting to me as I experienced Asha's discovery of Indian life and culture. Very touching ending. Audience for this book is most likely to be women. While engaging, the main characters are not as robust and well drawn, as the characters in White Tiger, also set in India.
Gretchen M. (Martinsburg, WV) (01/25/10)

Strong Female Characters
I had a hard time getting interested in this book for the first 5 or so chapters. The characters were not "coming to life" for me. But as I read on I was anxious to see how Somer and Asha, her adopted daughter from India, learned from their mistakes and grew up together. I was disappointed that the author didn't do the same with the main male character of the story, Krishnan, who never seemed to own up to his part in the marital problems. This book will appeal to readers who are interested in the role cultural differences play in marriage, family dynamics, adoption and the mother-daughter relationship. This book requires a lot of "reading between the lines." The author paints a very vivid picture of the contrasting economic, social and physical conditions that exist in India.
Phoenix M. (Eclectic, AL) (01/22/10)

Secret Daughter
This is a story of two mothers; Kavita from India and Somer from America. They are from two extremely different backgrounds and cultures, but each have family struggles and challenges to endure.

The story unfolds the daring love for their daughters and shows that this love is an instrument of healing in both families.

This book provides an excellent view of the everyday life of a woman in Indian culture. Kavita makes extreme sacrifices but triumphs over all.

This would make the perfect book for a club to discuss.
Susan B. (Cape Coral, FL) (01/22/10)

Conflict of Eastern and Western World
A story of two cultures, one daughter, and two marriages that shows the clashes that develop and the realities of their worlds. A very readable novel. I found the characters to be stereotyped and the flow of conversations and thoughts not fully developed. I wanted to read this book for an upcoming trip to India but did not find the verbal picture of India to be very informative.
Barbara C. (Riverside, CA) (01/21/10)

The Facets of Family
Seeing India and Mumbai from the points of view of so many people made it a feel-good sociological study. Who could not fall in love with Asha from the day she was born? These were real people and the writing improved as the book went along. I have a soft heart and I wasn't disappointed. I have never wanted to go to India, but now I am not so sure.
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