Reader reviews and comments on The Shock of The Fall, plus links to write your own review.

Summary |  Excerpt |  Reading Guide |  Reviews |  Beyond the book |  Readalikes |  Genres & Themes |  Author Bio

The Shock of The Fall

(originally published in hardcover in USA as Where the Moon Isn't)

by Nathan Filer

The Shock of The Fall by Nathan Filer X
The Shock of The Fall by Nathan Filer
  • Critics' Opinion:

    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    Nov 2013, 320 pages
    Paperback:
    Oct 2014, 320 pages

  • Rate this book


Book Reviewed by:
BookBrowse First Impression Reviewers

Buy This Book

About this Book

Reviews

Page 1 of 2
There are currently 14 reader reviews for The Shock of The Fall
Order Reviews by:

Write your own review!

akash neekhara (12/31/14)

skyfall....learn up.....
Great to boost up a person's mind, and the circumstances described are good to learn....
Sharon A. (Tierra Verde, FL) (11/06/13)

A Twisted Tale
Nathan Filer's book demonstrates a powerful writing style with a lot of nuances in the chapter titles, drawings and typeface. The author takes every opportunity to draw the reader into the tragic story of mental illness. This topic is certainly one being debated in the news and the way the author takes you inside the mind of a mentally ill Matthew to experience his troubles first hand makes for some heavy soul searching on the part of the reader. Filer grabs you from the first page when he lets Matthew speak directly to the reader who is immediately drawn into this family story. This is definitely a tough read, but an eye opening one too. I'll be waiting to see what he writes about next.
Connie H. (Evanston, IL) (10/29/13)

Where the Moon Isn't
Matt spills out his painful story in fits and starts both of insight and delusion. His struggle to come to terms with his reality is believably portrayed. I was reminded of Paddy Clarke Ha-ha-ha by Roddy Doyle.
Debbie M. (Grand Junction, CO) (10/29/13)

Where the Moon Isn't
Where the Moon Isn't opens your eyes to a world seen by someone with mental illness. As the world becomes more open to mental illness, we need to understand how the affected brain processes information.
Matt lost his brother when he was young. As he grows up , it is harder and harder for him to leave his brother behind. Nathan Filer takes us through these emotional years and show us someone who struggles to understand life.
Maggie S. (Durango, CO) (10/28/13)

Where The Moon Isn't
Where The moon Isn't by Nathan Filer is beautifully written. It is a sad, funny, hopeful, heart wrenching story of Matthew, the narrator and main character. He absolutely stole my heart. He is difficult and yet so vulnerable that I couldn't help but love him. A book that teaches me about other peoples frailties and differences and leads me to a better understanding of their story is one that stays with me. This is one such book. I absolutely loved it.
Carole C. (Upper Marlboro, MD) (10/25/13)

Missing the Moon
At first I thought the drawings and multiple type faces, fonts, and spacing might be mere gimmicks. Not so. This powerful novel by Nathan Filer uses all of these devices to enhance the telling of nineteen-year-old Matthew Homes' harrowing story.

As Matt battles schizophrenia -- and all the ensuing humiliations, set backs, and attitudes surrounding mental illness -- he is on a quest to discover what actually happened on a holiday night at the beach in Ocean Cove Park nine years earlier. On this night Matt's older brother Simon, a Down Syndrome child with "a beautiful smiling face that looked like the moon" dies.

For the next ten years, guilt-ridden Matt, whose parents are devastated, fights his way through the past to an understanding and the redemption of a memorial.

Readers who enjoyed the carefully crafted voice of the boy with Asperger's disease in Mark Haddon's The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night will find that Filer has captured beautifully the voice of a boy in search of truth and sanity in this tragically moving story of memory, madness, family resilience, and enduring love.
Shaun D. (Woodridge, IL) (10/23/13)

A strange but intriguing story
"Where the Moon Isn't" is definitely on the strange side. Unlike a lot of coming-of-age tales it doesn't have a morale; underlying, concluding or otherwise. If you like family-centered drama with a dash of mental illness, dysfunction and a protagonist who occasionally talks directly to you, you might want to give this book a try. It feels a bit like a Jim Crace novel - it can seem disjointed but hang in there as there is a small dose of redemption at the end. All in all a good read.
Mary Margaret F. (North Venice, FL) (10/22/13)

where the moon isn't
This debut novel was a jigsaw puzzle that caught your attention at the beginning and proceeded to put the pieces in place as pages were turned. The author puts you into Matthew's mind and from that vantage point all the other characters, their experiences and their foibles are explained. It is a very different presentation and your attention is held as you reach the ending which brings you back to the beginning of the novel.
I recommend this book.
  • Page
  • 1
  • 2

Beyond the Book:
  Down Syndrome

Support BookBrowse

Become a Member and discover books that entertain, engage & enlighten!

Join Today!

Editor's Choice

  • Book Jacket: Timekeepers
    Timekeepers
    by Simon Garfield
    If you can spare three minutes and 57 seconds, you can hear the driving, horse-gallop beat of Sade&#...
  • Book Jacket: How to Stop Time
    How to Stop Time
    by Matt Haig
    Tom Hazard, the protagonist of How to Stop Time, is afflicted with a condition of semi-immortality ...
  • Book Jacket: Mothers of Sparta
    Mothers of Sparta
    by Dawn Davies
    What it's about:
    The tagline on the back cover of Mothers of Sparta says it all: "Some women...
  • Book Jacket: Fortress America
    Fortress America
    by Elaine Tyler May
    In Fortress America, Elaine Tyler May presents a fascinating but alarming portrait of America's...

Book Discussion
Book Jacket
The Women in the Castle by Jessica Shattuck

A nuanced portrait of war, and of three women haunted by the past and the secrets they hold.

About the book
Join the discussion!

First Impressions

  • Book Jacket

    Next Year in Havana
    by Chanel Cleeton

    a Cuban-American woman travels to Havana, where she finds a family secret hidden since the revolution.
    Reader Reviews

  • Book Jacket

    As Bright as Heaven
    by Susan Meissner

    A story of a family reborn through loss and love in Philadelphia during the flu epidemic of 1918.
    Reader Reviews

Who Said...

I have always imagined that paradise will be a kind of library

Click Here to find out who said this, as well as discovering other famous literary quotes!

Word Play

Solve this clue:

G O T P, B The P, F T P

and be entered to win..

Books that     
entertain,
     engage

 & enlighten

Visitors can view some of BookBrowse for free. Full access is for members only.

Join Today!

Your guide toexceptional          books

BookBrowse seeks out and recommends books that we believe to be best in class. Books that will whisk you to faraway places and times, that will expand your mind and challenge you -- the kinds of books you just can't wait to tell your friends about.