Reader reviews and comments on Cutting For Stone, plus links to write your own review.

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Cutting For Stone

by Abraham Verghese

Cutting For Stone by Abraham Verghese
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    Readers' Opinion:

  • First Published:
    Feb 2009, 560 pages
    Paperback:
    Jan 2010, 560 pages

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Book Reviewed by:
Lucia Silva

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There are currently 33 reader reviews for Cutting For Stone
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Deborah (02/04/09)

A Captivating Novel
In the hands of a lesser writer, this relatively long book could become tedious. For example, it takes nearly 100 pages for the twins to get born, because Vergehese keeps shifting the point of view among six or seven characters. But he creates each one as a unique individual with a fascinating back story and makes you care about them all. This is a sprawling story, but one that keeps the reader captivated throughout. Yes, Verghese uses his medical background (sometimes a bit too extensively; several episodes seem unnecessarily long and complex for the average reader), but his focus is on the relationships between family, friends, and coworkers.

I had a particular interest in this book because I have sponsored two children from Ethiopia, and I appreciated learning more about the country, its people, and their plight.

Highly recommended.
Power Reviewer Judy (02/04/09)

Cutting for Stone - an unforgettable read!
I took my time with this book in order to savor not only the story & characters but also the life lessons revealed. Don't miss these lessons by skimming through this beautiful work! I've not read a book of this magnitude and significance for a long, long time. This is definitely a Must Read for 2009. Book Clubs who are dedicated to reading the finest of books will find the discussion worth every minute spent in reading this book - allow 6 weeks.
Deborah (01/22/09)

Cutting for Stone
Although this book is over 500 pages long, it's definitely worth the time it takes to read. It helps if you're interested in medicine, as the author and most of the main characters are doctors, and there are a number of descriptions of medical procedures. If not, you can easily skip over those parts and enjoy a story that spans several decades and continents. Aside from the plot, my favorite parts of the book were the descriptions of Ethiopia, where most of the story takes place--you almost feel like you are there. Probably not a good book for book clubs because it's so long, but I would recommend it to anyone who wants to get lost in a book for a while!
Ann (01/22/09)

Cutting for Stone
Somehow I was drawn to this book; perhaps it was because of my background and interest in medicine. Abraham Verghese has written a wonderful novel filled with the passion only a true physician can describe.

He has taken us back to a time and place where the study and practice of medicine was undertaken because of the hunger for knowledge, the dedication to the patient, and the love of the craft. The doctors and staff of the Missing Hospital quite often learned by doing and found that the patients in the area were not necessarily textbook cases.

Love for medicine is not the only subject that Verghese's novel touches on. He tells a tale of love for God, the strength of family and the plight of the poor in a third world country. Most importantly, he writes of the closeness of twins born connected physically then separated and yet forever remain undivided in mind and spirit.
Barbara (01/22/09)

Good but not great
To be honest, I lost interest in this book by the end of the third part and did not finish it -- there are so many terrific books out there. The protagonist engaged me well at the beginning. The prose was easy and fluid. Somewhere, this got lost with a sudden increase in the pace.
Christine (01/14/09)

Outstanding
Cutting for Stone was one of the best novels I've read in a long time.



The narrator is Marion Stone, who begins his life in Ethiopia. His story includes "his"tory of his biological parents, his surrogate parents, his twin brother, his love, his passion for medicine, his witnessing of Ethiopian history and unrest, his move to New York, and his eventual life as a surgeon. There are incredibly complicated relationships between Marion and his twin, Marion and the love of his life, and Marion and his father. Abraham Verghese does an extraordinary job of weaving all of these lives and events together in a way that is believable and so full of the human spirit.



Passion, pain, suffering, guilt, hidden truths, forgiveness and redemption act as cogs that continue to move the story forward with a force that made me look forward to every single page. Abraham is a gifted storyteller. I am sure this novel will not only be a bestseller, but will be among those having a lasting impact on anyone who reads it.
Lynn (01/14/09)

Cutting for Stone
I really enjoyed this book. With Ethiopia as the setting with all its turbulence, a varied and believable cast of characters this book was an adventure. The main characters did not always react to situations as you would expect. Because this is true in life, people don't do as you expect, it made the book very believable. I found myself picking up this book when I was supposed to be doing other things, just to follow the characters. I would highly recommend this book to anyone, do not let the size scare you.
Power Reviewer Anna (01/09/09)

An amazing read!
Having read My Own Country by Verghese I looked forward to his novel. It grabbed me with the first sentence. I was a bit frustrated that it took several chapters to get to what is happening in that sentence. The story has many twists and turns and is set in a part of the world that I know nothing about. There were many medical procedures that I didn't understand but that didn't stop me from enjoying the book. I would have given it a 5 rating if it had been edited better. There were some chapters that didn't have any connection to the basic story. I was impatient to get through them so I could get back to the main story. That said, it was hard to put the book down. I wanted to know what happened!

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