Excerpt from The Amateur Marriage by Anne Tyler, plus links to reviews, author biography & more

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The Amateur Marriage

by Anne Tyler

The Amateur Marriage by Anne Tyler
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  • First Published:
    Jan 2004, 320 pages
    Paperback:
    Oct 2004, 336 pages

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Even then, Miss Pelowski said later, she had known that he was a goner.

"Parade" was too formal a word, really, for the commotion on Dubrowski Street. It was true that several dozen young men were walking down the center of the pavement, but they were still in civilian clothes and they made no attempt to keep in step. The older of John Piazy's sons wore John's sailor cap from the Great War. Another boy, name unknown, had flung a regulation Army blanket around his shoulders like a cape. It was a shabby, straggly, unkempt little regiment, their faces chapped, their noses running in the cold.

Even so, people were enthusiastic. They waved homemade signs and American flags and the front page of the Baltimore Sun. They cheered at speeches—any speeches, any rousing phrases shouted over their heads. "You'll be home by New Year's, boys!" a man in earmuffs called, and "New Year's Day! Hurray!" zigzagged through the crowd.

When Michael Anton showed up with four girls, everybody assumed he was enlisting too. "Go get 'em, Michael!" someone shouted. Though John Piazy's wife said, "Ah, no. It would be the death of his mother, poor soul, with all she's had to suffer."

One of the four girls, the one in red, asked, "Will you be going, Michael?" An outsider, she was, but very easy on the eyes. The red of her coat brought out the natural glow of her skin, and a bandage on her temple made her look madcap and rakish. No wonder Michael gave her a long, considering stare before he spoke.

"Well," he said finally, and then he kind of hitched up his shoulders. "Well, naturally I will be!" he said.

A ragged cheer rang out from everyone standing nearby, and another of the girls—Wanda Bryk, in fact—pushed him forward until he had merged with the young men in the street. Leo Kazmerow walked on his left; the four girls scurried along the sidewalk on his right. "We love you, Michael!" Wanda cried, and Katie Vilna called, "Come back soon!" as if he were embarking for the trenches that very instant.

Then Michael was forgotten. He was swept away, and other young men replaced him: Davey Witt, Joe Dobek, Joey Serge. "You go show those Japs what we're made of!" Davey's father was shouting. For after all, a man was saying, who could tell when they'd have another chance to get even over Poland? An old woman was crying. John Piazy was telling everybody that neither one of his sons knew the meaning of the word "fear." And several people were starting in on the where-were-you-when-you-heard discussion. One had not heard till that morning; he'd been burying his mother. One had heard first thing, the first announcement on the radio, but had dismissed it as another Orson Welles hoax. And one, a woman, had been soaking in the bathtub when her husband knocked on the door. "You're never going to believe this," he'd called. "I just sat there," she said. "I just sat and sat. I sat until the water got cold."

Wanda Bryk returned with Katie Vilna and the brown-haired girl, but not the girl in red. The girl in red had vanished. It seemed she'd marched off to war with Michael Anton, somebody said.

They did all notice—those in the crowd who knew Michael. It was enough of a surprise so they noticed, and remarked to each other, and remembered for some time afterward.

Word got out, the next day, that Leo Kazmerow had been rejected because he was color-blind. Color-blind! people said. What did color have to do with fighting for your country? Unless maybe he couldn't recognize the color of someone's uniform. If he was aiming his gun in battle, say. But everyone agreed that there were ways to get around that. Put him on a ship! Sit him behind a cannon and show him where to shoot!

This conversation took place in Anton's Grocery. Mrs. Anton was answering the phone, but as soon as she hung up, someone asked, "And what's the news of Michael, Mrs. Anton?"

Excerpted from The Amateur Marriage by Anne Tyler Copyright © 2004 by Anne Tyler. Excerpted by permission of Knopf, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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