Excerpt from The Technologists by Matthew Pearl, plus links to reviews, author biography & more

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The Technologists

A Novel

by Matthew Pearl

The Technologists
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  • First Published:
    Feb 2012, 496 pages
    Paperback:
    Nov 2012, 512 pages

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Book Reviewed by:
Jennifer G Wilder

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Book 1
Civil and Topographical Engineering
I
April 4, 1868

Its proud lines intermittently visible through the early morning fog, the Light of the East might have been the most carefree ship that ever floated into Boston. Some of the sailors, their bearded faces browned and peeling from too much sun, cracked the last rations of walnuts in their fists or under their boot heels, singing some ancient song about a girl left behind. After wild March winds, stormy seas, dangerous ports, backbreaking work, and all the extremes of experience, they'd be handed a good pay at port, then freed to lose it to the city's myriad pleasures.

The navigator held the prow steady, his eye on his instruments, as they waited for the fog to disperse enough for their signal to be seen by the pilot boat. Although Boston Harbor stretched across seventy-five square miles, its channels had been so narrowed for purposes of defense that two large ships could not safely pass each other without the harbor pilot's assistance.

The Light's austere captain, Mr. Beal, strode the deck, his rare aura of high contentment amplified by the giddiness of his men. Beal could envision in his mind's eye the pilot boat breaking through the fog toward them, the pilot dressed like an undertaker, saluting indifferently and relieving Beal - for once - of his burdens. Then would come the view of the stretches of docks and piers, the solid granite warehouses never quite large enough for all the foreign cargo brought in by the merchants, then beyond that the State House's gold dome capping the horizon - the glittering cranium of the world's smartest city.

In the last few years, with so many men returned from fighting the rebellion, even modest Boston merchants had become veritable industrialists, beset as they were by excess hands. This city had prided itself on its history from the time it was little more than a quaint village, but Beal was old enough to know how artificial its modern visage was. Hills that formerly sloped through the city had been flattened, their detritus used to fill in various necks and bays, the foundations for streets and new neighborhoods and wharves such as the one that soon would welcome them. He could remember when the Public Garden was plain mud marking Boston's natural boundary.

A steam pipe bellowed from some unseen ship launching on its way or maybe, like them, gliding toward a journey's end, and Beal felt a solemn comradeship with all unknown voyagers. As he glimpsed the crescent moon and thought he would soon have enough light even in this nasty fog to lay course, his pleasant reverie was broken by a bright light flashing low in the water. When the captain craned forward, a lifeboat caught in the current, right in the path of their prow, sprang out from the mist.

His lookout cried out while Beal seized his speaking trumpet and shouted orders to change course. A woman's scream floated up. The schooner veered adroitly in efforts to avoid the small craft, but too late. The lifeboat's passengers jumped for their lives as their boat split into pieces against the Light's prow, the screaming woman thrusting a small child above the waves. To the shock of the captain, another obstacle broke through the dense curtain of fog on the schooner's starboard side: a pleasure steamer, with its flags flying the signals of distress, and taking on water.

"Clear lower deck!" Beal shouted.

Light of the East had nowhere to go. The side of its hull grazed and then caught the stranded steamship, right through the forward bulkhead: Pipes snapped and scalding-hot steam rushed into the heavy air as the hold of the schooner was ripped open. Now it, too, took on water, fast.

Chaos reigned on and off the ships. Beal snapped an order to throw the cargo overboard and repeated it sharply when his men hesitated. If they didn't unload right now, they would lose not only their profits, but also the ship and likely lives.

Excerpted from The Technologists by Matthew Pearl. Copyright © 2012 by Matthew Pearl. Excerpted by permission of Random House, a division of Random House, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.

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