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Migrations


A breathtaking page-turner and an ode to our threatened world.
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In a lecture, Niall states that wildlife is being indiscriminately slaughtered by our indifference. How does that resonate, as leaders debate the appropriate response to climate change? What is our responsibility to the planet?

Created: 08/05/21

Replies: 9

Posted Aug. 05, 2021 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
davinamw

Join Date: 10/15/10

Posts: 2913

In a lecture, Niall states that wildlife is being indiscriminately slaughtered by our indifference. How does that resonate, as leaders debate the appropriate response to climate change? What is our responsibility to the planet?

In one of his lectures, Niall says of wildlife: "They are being violently and indiscriminately slaughtered by our indifference. It has been decided by our leaders that economic growth is more important." How does that resonate in our world, as leaders debate the appropriate response to climate change? What is our responsibility to the planet?


Posted Aug. 06, 2021 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
rachelh

Join Date: 10/19/20

Posts: 46

RE: In a lecture, Niall states that ...

I think now more than ever it's critical not to turn a blind eye to the climate crisis; apathy can be detrimental and it's so important that we communicate that to our representatives. I think this story does a nice job at personalizing the crisis in a way that will hopefully resonate with a lot of readers.


Posted Aug. 07, 2021 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
mceacd

Join Date: 07/03/18

Posts: 44

RE: In a lecture, Niall states that ...

With a few exceptions, wildlife has been indiscriminately slaughtered for most of human history. Only if humans undergo a fundamental change in attitude toward life itself will we recognize that we do not have the right to treat wildlife as disposable and insignificant. It’s almost a religious issue, taking responsibility for more than just ourselves. At least leaders are discussing climate change and our impact on the Earth.


Posted Aug. 12, 2021 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
charlenem

Join Date: 09/27/15

Posts: 10

RE: In a lecture, Niall states that ...

I live by wetlands & a wildlife preserve. We have egrets, blue heron, anhinga, Limpkins, eagles, fox, fresh water otter, deer, alligators, etc. All this beautiful land has been sold to a greedy developer who has clear cut to make way for homes that are put up quickly & are poorly constructed. The history in this & other countries is, as coheirs to this planet, we have no regard for wildlife either in the sea or on land.
Something has to be done quickly by the world leaders. Instead of rounds of discussion, start doing something.
Anything. Before our wildlife become extinct like the carrier pigeon - Mitchener wrote the sun was blacked as hundreds, thousands of carrier pigeons flew. God help us that we don't end up like the world Charlotte McConaghy wrote so brilliantly in her book Migrations.


Posted Aug. 20, 2021 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
tmmarti

Join Date: 03/12/20

Posts: 17

RE: In a lecture, Niall states that ...

It’s frightening to me that this story is set in a near future, which sadly, could be a plausible one. I hope that never comes to pass, with future generations only knowing wild life by pictures they see in a history book.


Posted Aug. 21, 2021 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
vivianh

Join Date: 11/14/11

Posts: 115

RE: In a lecture, Niall states that ...

I personally do not subscribe to the belief that we are in a climate crisis. Instead, I believe it is more human encroachment on lands that destroy the habitats of creatures, the use of pesticides and genetically modified crops, the spread of houses, the alteration of waterways, and the failure of governments to enforce anti poaching laws. My husband had the good fortune to photograph Martha, the last carrier pigeon, for National Geographic, in a issue that reminded the world of species we have lost.


Posted Aug. 22, 2021 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
joanr

Join Date: 04/25/12

Posts: 49

RE: In a lecture, Niall states that ...

It resonates deeply. Indifference is the opposite of nurturing, and this book gives us a glimpse of what indifference can do if we allow it to govern our actions. It's an urgent message: do something now. As fellow beings on the earth. we have a moral imperative to do what we can to combat the climate crisis.


Posted Aug. 27, 2021 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
MarySS

Join Date: 08/27/21

Posts: 2

RE: In a lecture, Niall states that ...

It is so true and it's happening so incrementally that it's hard for many people to understand what's going on and what we need to do to slow it down. Read the recent UN Report on the climate and you realize how far we are down a dangerous path. Migrations helped provide a personal taste of what the future may look like if steps aren't taken.


Posted Aug. 30, 2021 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
rco

Join Date: 11/04/18

Posts: 30

RE: In a lecture, Niall states that ...

Climate change is playing a huge role in the demise of our wildlife. The rivers and streams in the West warmed to the extent this summer that fishing in many areas was curtailed as it was too stressful on the fish to be caught and released by the fly fisherman. There are areas in the U.S. where butterflies are disappearing because of low snowfalls and mild winters that don't protect them in the cocoon/pupae stage of their lives. People who poo poo climate warming and change just frustrate me.


Posted Sep. 05, 2021 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
scottishrose

Join Date: 07/24/11

Posts: 129

RE: In a lecture, Niall states that ...

Our responsibility to the planet is to be good stewards of its resources. One of the things that struck me most about the book was when it said people were on waiting lists to see the remaining forests and they might not all make it before the forests were gone. I live in an area that used to be covered with trees, where logging was a primary industry a hundred plus years ago. I can't imagine a world without trees.
We are all consumers of things that destroy the planet and I am sure most of us would be unwilling to give those things up. Still we need to find a balance, between what we want and the survival of our planet. Because humans may be more adaptable than many species, but even we, won't survive without the resources, such as food and water, that our environment provides for us.


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