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The Removes


A powerful, transporting novel about the addictive intensity and freedom of...
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Discuss The Removes by Tatjana Soli:
Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

Created: 08/22/18

Replies: 9

Posted Aug. 22, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
davinamw

Join Date: 10/15/10

Posts: 1584

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Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

When Custer was the leader of the Michigan Brigade during the Civil War, one in four of his soldiers were killed in battle, yet soldiers petitioned to be under his command. Why do you think that was? Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?


Posted Sep. 09, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
Gloria

Join Date: 03/11/15

Posts: 56

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RE: Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

Custer was such a larger than life character, and his strong belief in his own invincibility apparently extended to his men. I guess if you are going into battle, that's the kind of man you want leading the charge. I think soldiers today probably feel the same way.


Posted Sep. 12, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
christineb

Join Date: 10/13/11

Posts: 53

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RE: Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

I'm sure, just as it is today, it is usually wise to follow the bravest and strongest. I think it would be "a feather in your cap" so to speak to have served under such a well known and intrepid general.


Posted Sep. 13, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
peggyt

Join Date: 08/10/17

Posts: 36

RE: Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

Custer always felt he could not fail and so he projected an aura of success and people are always drawn to that. Now as well as then.


Posted Sep. 16, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
bonnieb

Join Date: 09/11/11

Posts: 123

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RE: Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

I think that soldiers saw Custer as invincible. His legend preceded him. Soldiers believed that his courage and invincibility would rub off on them.


Posted Sep. 17, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
kimk

Join Date: 10/16/10

Posts: 324

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RE: Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

I think the soldiers saw him as someone who was a winner, and could be ruthless to gain the victory. I'm not sure it's just soldiers who feel that way; I think sports people do, as do business people - everyone wants to be on a winning team!


Posted Sep. 17, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
ritai

Join Date: 02/15/17

Posts: 9

RE: Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

Custer was a confident leader that portrayed himself as a winner at all costs. In addition, he was a well known successful leader in the Civil War. Of course men would want to be under the command of someone like that.


Posted Sep. 17, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
vivianh

Join Date: 11/14/11

Posts: 44

RE: Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

Soldiers follow a leader that inspires them, a leader that ‘gets’ them, a leader who professes to support them. Yes, today soldiers will follow a leader who has their backs, who will put his or her own lives on the lines, who will not abandon them.


Posted Sep. 19, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
acstrine

Join Date: 02/06/17

Posts: 59

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RE: Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

I think it is interesting that given the statistics mentioned above (1 in 4 soldiers of the Michigan Brigade under Custer died during the Civil War), Custer still returned home from Gettysburg a hero. I'm not a military expert. Is 1 in 4 acceptable? Better than average?

I think the reporters at the time embraced Custer's "bad boy" persona. He had the uncharacteristic long hair. On the battlefield he was certainly his most confident boisterous self. Custer tended to get involved in the fighting himself, not oversee from the sidelines. He was like the popular high school quarterback. Maybe what he had would rub off on others just by being close to him.


Posted Sep. 19, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
BuffaloGirl

Join Date: 01/13/18

Posts: 13

RE: Why do you think soldiers petitioned to be under Custer's command. Do you think soldiers today feel similarly about their commanders?

Custer established his reputation as brave and fearless in the Civil War and this earned him promotion to a rank of brigadier general. Most individuals have a need to be part of a “tribe” and to be in a successful group (tribe). We see this evidenced today in the seemingly endless books, seminars, college courses, etc on leadership, building successful teams, etc. Specific to our military, I think the same individual desires to be part of a successful team are present, but as to whether the desire is stronger than in the general population, I don’t have the close proximity to the military to have a valid opinion.

Historically, many did petition to be under his command, but as time went on he became known as “Old Ironpants” for his harsh discipline and the petitioning to serve under him did decrease. He also had some very harsh and vocal critics among his fellow officers, such as Frederick Benteen, which diminished his aura.


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