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The Winter Soldier


A story of war and medicine, of finding love in the sweeping tides of history, ...
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What do you know about PTSD? Did the book shed any light on it for you? What do you think of the cures for it that were attempted in the early 20th century? How well do we handle PTSD cases today?

Created: 09/19/18

Replies: 7

Posted Sep. 19, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
davinamw

Join Date: 10/15/10

Posts: 3058

What do you know about PTSD? Did the book shed any light on it for you? What do you think of the cures for it that were attempted in the early 20th century? How well do we handle PTSD cases today?

Many soldiers arrived at the hospital with what was diagnosed as "nervous shock." Later it would become known as "shell-shock," and these days we refer to it as PTSD. What do you know about this condition? Did the book shed any light on it for you? What do you think of the cures for it that were attempted in the early 20th century? How well or poorly do you think we handle PTSD cases today?


Posted Sep. 24, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
renem

Join Date: 12/01/16

Posts: 292

RE: What do you know about PTSD? Did the book shed any light on it for you? What do you think of the cures for it that were attempted in the early 20th century? How well do we handle PTSD cases today?

What I know about PTSD is that it wasn't a diagnosable disease before 1980. In the past it was often misdiagnosed as different anxiety disorders and neuroses. I'm sure that there are many families who can think back about a loved one who came back from the war who just wasn't "right" anymore. My own ex-brother-in-law was diagnosed with what was then referred to as "post-Vietnam disorder".
I also know that PTSD is not due to any mental weakness and that almost anyone can be stricken with it if there is enough external factors or events (not necessarily war) that are extremely stressful or traumatic. I also know that as long as there have been wars, there has been PTSD. I'm sure there must have been a lot of frustration by all in trying to deal with and cure this very debilitating condition. Even the famous General George Patton was know to have slapped one of his soldiers who was "nervously incapable of combat".
The author did an excellent job explaining the subject of PTSD to his readers. I was not aware of the types of treatments used in the early 20th century, but was not surprised by the ones the author described.
Today there are a lot more options for controlling PTSD. The use of psychotherapy and counseling and the use of medication or a combination of the both is the most common approach. There are also a few experimental therapies too. Medical science is ever-changing so there is always hope on the horizon.


Posted Sep. 25, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
RuthEh

Join Date: 07/31/17

Posts: 62

RE: What do you know about PTSD? Did the book shed any light on it for you? What do you think of the cures for it that were attempted in the early 20th century? How well do we handle PTSD cases today?

I have several good friends with PTSD. I watch them flinch at loud noises, back against a wall to feel safe, afraid of being touched or hugged. They can have "good" days and "bad" days. They will hide when they are scared. That's what I know about PTSD. It's very debilitating. I was shocked with the treatment of cocaine, guess they used whatever they had. PTSD is still a problem today. Though meds are available, it has to be consumed to work. Costs can make the meds prohibitive, our society is lax in trying to help. Though meds and therapy are available, many will not use them. It's sad.


Posted Sep. 25, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
wandak

Join Date: 04/11/18

Posts: 10

RE: What do you know about PTSD? Did the book shed any light on it for you? What do you think of the cures for it that were attempted in the early 20th century? How well do we handle PTSD cases today?

I have a nephew with PTSD from serving time in the army. He dtruggles witn alcoholism and depression. The book did a good job explaining PTSD and made me aware of ways it effects people


Posted Oct. 01, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
PiperUp

Join Date: 10/27/15

Posts: 146

RE: What do you know about PTSD? Did the book shed any light on it for you? What do you think of the cures for it that were attempted in the early 20th century? How well do we handle PTSD cases today?

I think we're better at handling PTSD cases than in the past but think there's still a long way to go given that a study from 1999-2010 showed that an avg of 22 veterans committed suicide daily during that time period. There have been a significant amount of studies showing that cannabis/marijuana are helpful in treating PTSD but our govt continues to deny Vets legal access to cannabis/marijuana. A senate bill was introduced in April of this year but given the divisiveness of our Congress, I wonder if it will be able to obtain bi-partisan support.


Posted Oct. 01, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
dorothyh

Join Date: 01/23/15

Posts: 192

RE: What do you know about PTSD? Did the book shed any light on it for you? What do you think of the cures for it that were attempted in the early 20th century? How well do we handle PTSD cases today?

I do not know too much, treatment has improved over the years but it has a way to go. Those that serve our country should have paid for treatment.


Posted Oct. 02, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
alwaysdaddygirl's Gravatar
alwaysdaddygirl

Join Date: 09/04/16

Posts: 110

RE: What do you know about PTSD? Did the book shed any light on it for you? What do you think of the cures for it that were attempted in the early 20th century? How well do we handle PTSD cases today?

Aloha,

First Mahalo to all who had loves ones that served! I agree with mostly all of the posts. My daddy and uncle served.

I have PTSD. I had it since I was fourteen but was not diagnosed correctly until like my late thirties. I am 41 now. How PTSD is described in this book, during that time period, is correct. It sad to know how much folks had to suffer because they were not aware of what the real problem is.

Yes, PTSD has come along way. However, It does need to be improve still. Someone else posted about the 22 veterans commiting suicide a day. For me, that proof that PTSD still has a long way to improve. Again, it got better but not enough. The stigma assocated with mental illness is another proof that so much still needs to be done.

Sometimes the reasons for not wanting to take the meds is because of the weight gain. So many folks see me and assume I am fat because I eat a lot. They have no clue that the longer you are on mental illness pills, the higher change it is to gain weight. I do work out. It why I am NOT on blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. Sadly, when your battling a mental illness, the last thing a person need is the stigma about your weight. I keep changing medicines. My saving grace with my weight is my height.

Another reason why some do not take it is because they feel it cloud their thinking process. For some it can make them sick. Meaning they have serious digestive problems, etc. Therapy can be good and bad. When your battling demons in your head and you had a bad therapist( sadly there is a lot of bad therapists. More then most folks realize.), it can make hard for you to trust another therapist.

There are other reasons on why pills are not taken. To me, a lot of what book describes with PTSD still happens today. The best way to explain is still today many folks do not truly understand what mental illness. A lot of it has to do with mental stigma. For some cultures, even today, mental illness is frown upon.

I do hope that one day the mental stigma will be less.

Mahalo,
Tiffany April


Posted Oct. 28, 2018 Go to Top | Go to bottom | link | alert
lesleyf

Join Date: 05/14/11

Posts: 110

RE: What do you know about PTSD? Did the book shed any light on it for you? What do you think of the cures for it that were attempted in the early 20th century? How well do we handle PTSD cases today?

Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome. What a mouthful. I think my grandpa had it, if just slightly. He, of course, never spoke about the war but also he would descend to the basement and stay there for hours if family and company came to visit grandma. Sometimes a few of the uncles would join him for a while, and that seemed ok, but they all didn't talk much either!
A traumatically stressful incident can be just about anything, though, and so, sometimes, it comes to someone who never went to war at all. Then, it's even more odd and difficult to diagnose. Car accidents, rape, a witnessed tragedy of some other sort might also be the cause, so the sooner we help the vets who must have the worst PTSD, we will be able to help others with a source other than war.
The description in this book was hard to read but likely is very true to PTSD.


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